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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
 (Mark One)
 
 QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2020
 or
  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from               to            
Commission file number 001-37418
Axovant Gene Therapies Ltd.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Bermuda 98-1333697
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
Suite 1, 3rd Floor
11-12 St. James's Square
London SW1Y 4LB, United Kingdom
 Not Applicable
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: +44 203 997 8931
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each ClassTrading SymbolName of each exchange on which registered
Common Shares, par value $0.00001 per shareAXGTThe Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.   Yes  ☒   No  o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).   Yes  ☒   No  o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer", "accelerated filer", "smaller reporting company," and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large accelerated filerAccelerated filer
Non-accelerated filerSmaller reporting company
Emerging growth company
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).   Yes     No  ☒
The number of shares outstanding of the Registrant’s common shares, $0.00001 par value per share, on August 7, 2020, was 41,956,478.



AXOVANT GENE THERAPIES LTD.
QUARTERLY REPORT ON FORM 10-Q
FOR THE QUARTER ENDED JUNE 30, 2020
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 Page
 
 
 
 

2


PART I.         FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1.         Financial Statements (Unaudited)
AXOVANT GENE THERAPIES LTD.
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(Unaudited, in thousands, except share and per share amounts)
 
June 30, 2020March 31, 2020
Assets 
Current assets:  
Cash and cash equivalents$55,482  $80,752  
Prepaid expenses and other current assets3,998  2,971  
Income tax receivable1,717  1,707  
Total current assets61,197  85,430  
Long-term investment8,055  5,871  
Other non-current assets46  46  
Operating lease right-of-use assets1,105  1,532  
Property and equipment, net633  801  
Total assets$71,036  $93,680  
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity   
Current liabilities:  
Accounts payable$2,970  $4,412  
Accrued expenses8,949  11,319  
Current portion of operating lease liabilities465  889  
Current portion of long-term debt  15,423  
Total current liabilities12,384  32,043  
Operating lease liabilities, net of current portion71  79  
Total liabilities12,455  32,122  
Commitments and contingencies (Note 11)
Shareholders’ equity:  
Common shares, par value $0.00001 per share, 1,000,000,000 shares authorized, 40,973,380 and 39,526,299 issued and outstanding at June 30, 2020 and March 31, 2020, respectively
    
Additional paid-in capital825,830  820,257  
Accumulated deficit(767,238) (758,644) 
Accumulated other comprehensive loss(11) (55) 
Total shareholders’ equity 58,581  61,558  
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity $71,036  $93,680  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.
3


AXOVANT GENE THERAPIES LTD.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations
(Unaudited, in thousands, except share and per share amounts)

 Three Months Ended June 30,
 20202019
Operating expenses:
Research and development expenses
(includes $563 and $721 of share-based compensation expense for the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively)
$5,194  $21,090  
General and administrative expenses
(includes $1,027 and $1,414 of share-based compensation expense for the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively)
4,640  6,468  
Total operating expenses9,834  27,558  
Other (income) expenses:
Interest expense796  1,558  
Other income(2,066) (1,097) 
Loss before income tax expense(8,564) (28,019) 
Income tax expense30  38  
Net loss $(8,594) $(28,057) 
Net loss per common share — basic and diluted$(0.20) $(1.23) 
Weighted-average common shares outstanding — basic and diluted
43,287,222  22,780,114  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.







4


AXOVANT GENE THERAPIES LTD.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss
(Unaudited, in thousands)

Three Months Ended June 30,
20202019
Net loss$(8,594) $(28,057) 
Other comprehensive income (loss):
Foreign currency translation adjustment44  (972) 
Total other comprehensive income (loss)44  (972) 
Comprehensive loss$(8,550) $(29,029) 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

5


AXOVANT GENE THERAPIES LTD.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity
(Unaudited, in thousands, except share amounts)

Common SharesAdditional Paid-in CapitalAccumulated
Deficit
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)Total
Shareholders’
Equity
 
 SharesAmount
Balance at March 31, 2019
22,779,891  $  $741,318  $(686,016) $911  $56,213  
Issuance of shares upon exercise of stock options
781  —  5  —  —  5  
Share-based compensation expense
—  —  2,135  —  —  2,135  
Capital contribution received from Roivant Sciences, Inc.
—  —  28  —  —  28  
Foreign currency translation adjustment
—  —  —  —  (972) (972) 
Net loss
—  —  —  (28,057) —  (28,057) 
Balance at June 30, 2019
22,780,672  $  $743,486  $(714,073) $(61) $29,352  

Common SharesAdditional Paid-in CapitalAccumulated
Deficit
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)Total
Shareholders’
Equity
 
 SharesAmount
Balance at March 31, 2020
39,526,299  $  $820,257  $(758,644) $(55) $61,558  
Shares issued for restricted stock units
53,653  —  —  —  —    
Shares sold in connection with at-the-market offering, net of brokerage fees and offering expenses of $0.5 million
1,393,428  —  3,930  —  —  3,930  
Share-based compensation expense
—  —  1,590  —  —  1,590  
Capital contribution received from Roivant Sciences, Inc.
—  —  53  —  —  53  
Foreign currency translation adjustment
—  —  —  —  44  44  
Net loss
—  —  —  (8,594) —  (8,594) 
 Balance at June 30, 2020
40,973,380  $  $825,830  $(767,238) $(11) $58,581  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.
6


AXOVANT GENE THERAPIES LTD.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(Unaudited, in thousands)

Three Months Ended June 30,
20202019
Cash flows from operating activities: 
Net loss$(8,594) $(28,057) 
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities: 
Unrealized foreign currency translation adjustment 44  (972) 
Amortization of operating lease right-of-use assets427  369  
Share-based compensation expense1,590  2,135  
Depreciation and non-cash amortization492  426  
Non-cash gain on long-term investment(2,184)   
Change in operating lease liabilities(432) (369) 
Other3  25  
Changes in operating assets and liabilities: 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets(1,027) 203  
Income tax receivable(10) (190) 
Other non-current assets  340  
Accounts payable(1,442) 1,198  
Accrued expenses(2,370) 7,161  
Net cash used in operating activities(13,503) (17,731) 
Cash flows from investing activities: 
Purchases of property and equipment(19) (78) 
Net cash used in investing activities(19) (78) 
Cash flows from financing activities: 
Payments on long-term debt(15,731) (5,047) 
Capital contribution received from Roivant Sciences, Inc.
53  28  
Cash proceeds from stock option exercises  5  
Cash proceeds from issuance of common shares, net of issuance costs3,930    
Net cash used in financing activities(11,748) (5,014) 
Net change in cash and cash equivalents(25,270) (22,823) 
Cash and cash equivalents—beginning of period80,752  106,999  
Cash and cash equivalents—end of period$55,482  $84,176  
Non-cash operating activities:
Operating lease right-of-use assets recognized upon and since the adoption of ASC 842, Leases, on April 1, 2019
$  $2,986  
Operating lease liabilities recognized upon and since the adoption of ASC 842, Leases, on April 1, 2019
  2,400  
Amounts reclassified from other non-current assets to operating lease right-of-use assets upon the adoption of ASC 842, Leases, on April 1, 2019
  586  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.
7


AXOVANT GENE THERAPIES LTD.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)
Note 1—Description of Business
Axovant Gene Therapies Ltd. ("AGT"), together with its wholly owned subsidiaries (the "Company"), is a clinical-stage company focused on gene therapy for neurodegenerative diseases. The Company is developing a pipeline of innovative product candidates for the treatment of these debilitating diseases, including Parkinson's disease, GM1 gangliosidosis and GM2 gangliosidosis (including Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease). The Company is dedicated to realizing the potential of gene therapies to offer transformative patient outcomes in areas of high unmet medical need.
AGT is an exempted limited company incorporated under the laws of Bermuda, which was originally formed under the name Roivant Neurosciences Ltd. in October 2014 and changed its name to Axovant Sciences Ltd. in March 2015 and to Axovant Gene Therapies Ltd. in March 2019. AGT has seven wholly owned subsidiaries:
Axovant Holdings Limited ("AHL");
Axovant Sciences, Inc. ("ASI");
Axovant Sciences GmbH ("ASG");
Axovant Sciences America, Inc. ("ASA");
Axovant Treasury Holdings, Inc. ("ATH");
Axovant Treasury, Inc. ("ATI"); and
Axovant Sciences Europe Limited.
Since its inception, the Company has devoted substantially all of its efforts to organizing and staffing the Company, raising capital, acquiring product candidates and advancing its product candidates into clinical development. The Company has determined that it has one operating and reporting segment as it allocates resources and assesses financial performance on a consolidated basis. The Company does not expect to generate revenue unless and until it successfully completes development and obtains regulatory approval for one of its product candidates.
Note 2—Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
(A) Basis of Presentation:
The Company’s fiscal year ends on March 31, and its fiscal quarters end on June 30, September 30 and December 31.
These unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States ("U.S. GAAP") for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and disclosures required by U.S. GAAP for complete financial statements. These unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes should be read in conjunction with the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020 (the "Annual Report"), filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") on June 10, 2020. In the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring adjustments) considered necessary to present fairly the financial position of the Company and its results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented have been included. Operating results for the three months ended June 30, 2020 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending March 31, 2021, for any other interim period, or for any other future year.
Any reference in these notes to applicable guidance is meant to refer to the authoritative U.S. GAAP as found in the Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC"), and as amended by Accounting Standards Updates ("ASU"), issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB"). These unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries. The Company has no unconsolidated subsidiaries. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. Certain prior period balances have been reclassified to conform to the current period presentation.
These unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes have been prepared on the basis that the Company will continue as a going concern, and do not include any adjustments to reflect the possible future effects on the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that may result from the possible inability of the Company to continue as a going concern (see Note 2(B)).
8


A 1-for-8 reverse share split of the Company's outstanding common stock was effected on May 8, 2019 as approved by the Company's Board of Directors and a majority of its shareholders, which reduced the number of common shares issued and outstanding from approximately 182.2 million to 22.8 million as of March 31, 2019. As such, all references to share and per share amounts in these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes have been retroactively restated to reflect the 1-for-8 reverse share split, except for the authorized number of shares of the Company's common stock and the par value per share, which were not affected.
There have been no significant changes in the Company’s accounting policies from those disclosed in its Annual Report.
(B) Going Concern and Management's Plans:
The Company assesses and determines its ability to continue as a going concern in accordance with the provisions of ASC Subtopic 205-40, "Presentation of Financial Statements—Going Concern" ("ASC Subtopic 205-40"), which requires the Company to evaluate whether there are conditions or events that raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern within one year after the date that its annual and interim consolidated financial statements are issued. Certain additional financial statement disclosures are required if such conditions or events are identified. If and when an entity’s liquidation becomes imminent, financial statements should be prepared under the liquidation basis of accounting. Determining the extent, if any, to which conditions or events raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern, or the extent to which mitigating plans sufficiently alleviate any such substantial doubt, as well as whether or not liquidation is imminent, requires significant judgment by management.
The Company has evaluated whether there are conditions and events, considered in the aggregate, that raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern within one year after the date the consolidated financial statements are issued.
As of June 30, 2020, the Company’s cash and cash equivalents totaled $55.5 million and its accumulated deficit was $767.2 million. For the three months ended June 30, 2020 and the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, the Company incurred net losses of $8.6 million and $72.6 million, respectively. The Company expects to continue to incur significant operating and net losses, as well as negative cash flows from operations, for the foreseeable future as it continues to develop its gene therapy product candidates and prepares for potential future regulatory approvals and commercialization of its products, if approved. The Company has not generated any revenue to date and does not expect to generate product revenue unless and until it successfully completes development and obtains regulatory approval for at least one of its product candidates, and its current cash and cash equivalents balance will not be sufficient to complete all necessary development activities and commercially launch its products. The Company anticipates that its current cash and cash equivalents balance will not be sufficient to sustain operations beyond nine months following the date that these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and notes were issued, which raises substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern.
To continue as a going concern, the Company will need, among other things, to raise additional capital. The Company continually assesses multiple options to obtain additional funding to support its operations, including proceeds from offerings of the Company’s equity securities or debt, cash received from the exercise of outstanding common stock options, or transactions involving product development, technology licensing or collaboration arrangements, or other sources of capital to complete its currently planned development programs. Management can provide no assurances that it can raise a sufficient amount of financing for the Company on favorable terms, if at all. Although the Company has successfully obtained financing in the past, and management believes that it will continue to do so in the future, ASC Subtopic 205-40 does not permit future financing activities that are not probable of being implemented and probable of alleviating the conditions that raise substantial doubt to be included in the Company's assessment of its liquidity.
Due to these uncertainties, there is substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as going concern. These unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes have been prepared on the basis that the Company will continue as a going concern, and do not include any adjustments to reflect the possible future effects on the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that may result from the possible inability of the Company to continue as a going concern.

9


(C) Use of Estimates:
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. The Company regularly evaluates estimates and assumptions related to certain assets, including which costs are charged to research and development and general and administrative expense, as well as assumptions used to estimate its ability to continue as a going concern and estimate the fair value of its stock option awards. Specifically, the Company estimates the grant date fair value of stock option awards with only time-based vesting requirements using a Black-Scholes valuation model and uses a Monte Carlo Simulation method under the income approach to estimate the grant date fair value of stock option awards with market-based performance conditions. The Company bases its estimates and assumptions on historical experience and on various other factors that it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results could differ from those estimates.
Additionally, the Company assessed the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on its operations and financial results as of June 30, 2020 and through the date of issuance of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements. The Company’s analysis was informed by the facts and circumstances as they were known to the Company. This assessment considered the impact COVID-19 may have on financial estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and expenses.
(D) Net Loss per Common Share:
Basic net loss per common share is computed by dividing the net loss applicable to common shareholders by the weighted-average number of common shares and 3,301,998 pre-funded warrants (see Note 9(B)) outstanding during the period, without further consideration for potentially dilutive securities. In accordance with ASC Topic 260, Earnings Per Share, the pre-funded warrants are included in the computation of basic net loss per share because the exercise price is negligible and they are fully vested and exercisable at any time after the original issuance date. Diluted net loss per common share is computed by dividing the net loss applicable to common shareholders by the diluted weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period calculated in accordance with the treasury stock method. In periods in which the Company reports a net loss, all common share equivalents are deemed anti-dilutive such that basic net loss per common share and diluted net loss per common share are equivalent. Potentially dilutive common shares have been excluded from the diluted net loss per common share computations in all periods presented because such securities have an anti-dilutive effect on net loss per common share due to the Company’s net loss. There are no reconciling items used to calculate the weighted-average number of total common shares outstanding for basic and diluted net loss per common share data. Restricted Stock Units ("RSUs") and stock options outstanding for approximately 0.8 million and 2.3 million common shares, respectively, were not included in the calculation of diluted weighted-average common shares outstanding for the three months ended June 30, 2020 because they were anti-dilutive given the net loss of the Company. Stock options for approximately 3.0 million common shares were not included in the calculation of diluted weighted-average common shares outstanding for the three months ended June 30, 2019 because they were anti-dilutive given the net loss of the Company.
(E) Financial Instruments and Fair Value Measurement:
The Company utilizes fair value measurement guidance prescribed by accounting standards to value its financial instruments.
The guidance establishes a fair value hierarchy for instruments measured at fair value that distinguishes between assumptions based on market data (observable inputs) and the Company’s own assumptions (unobservable inputs). Observable inputs are inputs that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability based on market data obtained from sources independent of the Company. Unobservable inputs are inputs that reflect the Company’s assumptions about the inputs that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability and are developed based on the best information available in the circumstances.
Fair value is defined as the exchange price, or exit price, representing the amount that would be received from the sale of an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants. As a basis for considering market participant assumptions in fair value measurements, the guidance establishes a three-tier fair value hierarchy that distinguishes among the following:
Level 1-Valuations are based on unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the Company has the ability to access.
Level 2-Valuations are based on quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active and models for which all significant inputs are observable, either directly or indirectly.
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Level 3-Valuations are based on inputs that are unobservable (supported by little or no market activity) and significant to the overall fair value measurement.
To the extent the valuation is based on models or inputs that are less observable or unobservable in the market, the determination of fair value requires more judgment. Accordingly, the degree of judgment exercised by the Company in determining fair value is greatest for instruments categorized in Level 3. A financial instrument’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest level of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement.
The Company’s financial instruments include cash and cash equivalents, a long-term investment and accounts payable. Cash consists of non-interest-bearing deposits denominated in the U.S. dollar and Swiss franc, while cash equivalents consists of interest-bearing money market fund deposits denominated in the U.S. dollar, which are invested in debt securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government and repurchase agreements fully collateralized by U.S. Treasury and U.S. government securities. Cash and accounts payable are stated at their respective historical carrying amounts, which approximate fair value due to their short-term nature. The carrying value of the Company's money market fund included in cash and cash equivalents of $40.5 million at June 30, 2020 approximated fair value, which is based on quoted prices in active markets for identical securities.
At June 30, 2020, the Company held a long-term investment in nonredeemable convertible preferred stock, which is accounted for in accordance with the provisions of ASC 321, "Investments - Equity Securities" whereby the Company elected to use the measurement alternative therein (see Note 4).
The following table summarizes the fair value of the Company's money market fund included in cash equivalents based on the inputs used at June 30, 2020 in determining such values (in thousands):
Fair ValuePrice Quotations (Level 1)Significant Other Observable Inputs (Level 2)Significant Unobservable Inputs (Level 3)
Money market fund$40,450  $40,450  $  $  
(F) Recent Accounting Pronouncements:
In February 2016, the FASB issued Topic 842, which requires lessees to recognize on their consolidated balance sheets a liability to make lease payments and a right-of-use asset representing their right to use the underlying asset for the lease term for both finance and operating leases with lease terms greater than twelve months. Topic 842 is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018. Early adoption is permitted. A modified retrospective transition approach is required, applying the new standard to all leases existing at the date of initial application. Topic 842 allows entities to choose to use either (i) the effective date or (ii) the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements as the date of initial application. Topic 842 provides a number of optional practical expedients in transition. The Company adopted Topic 842 on April 1, 2019 using the optional modified retrospective transition method. Comparative periods were not restated. For leases that commenced prior to April 1, 2019, the Company elected the following package of practical expedients when assessing the transition impact: (1) not to reassess whether any expired or existing contracts are or contain leases; (2) not to reassess the lease classification for any expired or existing leases; and (3) not to reassess initial direct costs for any existing leases. The Company also elected to: (1) use the total lease term in its initial incremental borrowing rate calculation; (2) combine its lease and non-lease components and account for them as a single lease component; and (3) not apply the use of hindsight in determining the lease term when considering lessee options to extend or terminate the lease and to purchase the underlying asset. Upon adoption, the Company recorded corresponding aggregate operating lease right-of-use assets and operating lease liabilities of $3.0 million and $2.4 million, respectively, including $0.6 million of prepaid rent previously classified within other non-current assets in the Company’s consolidated balance sheet that was reclassified to operating lease right-of-use assets. The adoption of the new standard did not materially impact the Company’s consolidated results of operations and cash flows and did not have an impact on the Company’s beginning accumulated deficit balance. For additional information regarding the Company’s leases, see Note 5 for further information regarding the impact of the Company's adoption of Topic 842.
In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU No. 2019-12, "Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes" ("ASU No. 2019-12"). ASU No. 2019-12 simplifies the accounting for income taxes, eliminates certain exceptions within Income Taxes (Topic 740), and clarifies certain aspects of the current guidance to promote consistency among reporting entities, and is effective for fiscal years, and for interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2020, with early adoption permitted. Most amendments within ASU No. 2019-12 are required to be applied on a prospective basis, while certain amendments must be applied on a retrospective or modified retrospective basis. The Company early adopted the provisions of ASU No. 2019-12 on April 1, 2020, which did not have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.
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In January 2020, the FASB issued ASU No. 2020-01, "Investments — Equity Securities: Clarifying the Interactions between Topic 321, Topic 323, and Topic 815" ("ASU No. 2020-01"). ASU No. 2020-01 clarifies that an entity should consider observable transactions that require it to either apply or discontinue the equity method of accounting for the purposes of applying the measurement alternative in accordance with ASC 321, "Investments — Equity Securities" immediately before applying or upon discontinuing the equity method of accounting in ASC 323, "Investments—Equity Method and Joint Ventures." The provisions of ASU No. 2020-01 are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, and interim periods within those fiscal years with early adoption permitted, including early adoption in an interim period for public business entities for periods for which financial statements have not yet been issued. While the Company does not expect the adoption of ASU No. 2020-01 to materially impact the Company's consolidated financial statements and related disclosures because it does not currently account for any investments pursuant to the equity method of accounting in accordance with ASC 323, "Investments—Equity Method and Joint Ventures", the impact on the Company's consolidated financial statements and disclosures will depend on the facts and circumstances of any specific future transactions.
Other recent accounting pronouncements issued by the FASB (including its Emerging Issues Task Force), the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and the SEC did not, or are not believed by management to, have a material impact on the Company’s present or future consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
Note 3—License and Collaboration Agreements
(A) Oxford BioMedica License Agreement
In June 2018, the Company, through its wholly owned subsidiary, ASG, entered into an exclusive license agreement ("the Oxford Agreement") with Oxford BioMedica (UK) Ltd. ("Oxford"), pursuant to which the Company received a worldwide, exclusive, royalty-bearing, sub-licensable license under certain patents and other intellectual property controlled by Oxford to develop and commercialize AXO-Lenti-PD and related gene therapy products for all diseases and conditions. Upon entering into the Oxford Agreement, the Company made an upfront nonrefundable payment of $5.0 million to Oxford for process development work and clinical supply that Oxford is obligated to provide, of which $1.6 million remained capitalized within prepaid expenses and other current assets in the Company's unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheet as of June 30, 2020, which will be recorded to research and development expense as the process development work and clinical supply are provided by Oxford. During the three months ended June 30, 2019, certain development milestones were achieved resulting in a $13.0 million net payment due to Oxford. Excluding development milestones achieved, the Company incurred $1.7 million and $1.4 million of AXO-Lenti-PD program-specific costs within research and development expenses in its unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations during the three months ended June 30, 2020 and June 30, 2019, respectively. The Company paid Oxford a total of $0.5 million and $1.3 million during the three months ended June 30, 2020 and June 30, 2019, respectively.
(B) Benitec Biopharma License and Collaboration Agreement
In July 2018, the Company, through its wholly owned subsidiary, ASG, entered into a license and collaboration agreement (the "Benitec Agreement") with Benitec Biopharma Limited ("Benitec"), pursuant to which the Company a received a worldwide, exclusive, royalty-bearing, sub-licensable license under certain patents and other intellectual property controlled by Benitec to develop and commercialize investigational gene therapy AXO-AAV-OPMD and related gene therapy products (collectively, the "AXO-AAV-OPMD Program") for all diseases and conditions. The Company terminated the Benitec Agreement in its entirety, effective September 3, 2019. The Company incurred $1.8 million of AXO-AAV-OPMD program-specific costs within research and development expenses in its unaudited condensed consolidated statement of operations, and the Company paid Benitec a total of $0.7 million, during the three months ended June 30, 2019.
(C) The University of Massachusetts Medical School Exclusive License Agreement
In December 2018, the Company, through its wholly owned subsidiary, ASG, entered into an exclusive license agreement (the "UMMS Agreement"), with the University of Massachusetts Medical School ("UMMS") pursuant to which the Company received a worldwide, royalty-bearing, sub-licensable license under certain patent applications and any patents issuing therefrom, biological materials and know-how controlled by UMMS to develop and commercialize gene therapy product candidates, including AXO-AAV-GM1 and AXO-AAV-GM2, for the treatment of GM1 gangliosidosis and GM2 gangliosidosis (including Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease), respectively. In October 2019, a certain development and regulatory milestone was achieved resulting in a $1.0 million payment due to UMMS. During the three months ended June 30, 2020 and June 30, 2019, the Company incurred $0.4 million and $1.0 million, respectively, of program-specific costs excluding development and regulatory milestones achieved related to AXO-AAV-GM1 and AXO-AAV-GM2 within research and development expenses in its unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations. The Company paid a total of zero and $1.0 million to UMMS during the three months ended June 30, 2020 and June 30, 2019, respectively.

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Note 4—Long-term Investment
On February 13, 2019, ASG entered into a share subscription agreement (the "Subscription Agreement") to purchase up to approximately 8.1 million shares of nonredeemable convertible preferred stock of Arvelle Therapeutics B.V. ("Arvelle") in exchange for €0.00001 per share paid in cash, as well as certain goods and services provided by ASG to Arvelle. The first closing under the Subscription Agreement occurred on February 25, 2019 with ASG purchasing approximately 5.9 million nonredeemable convertible preferred shares of Arvelle, which was initially recorded at a fair value of $5.9 million and was capitalized as a long-term investment in the Company's consolidated balance sheet and recorded to other non-operating income in the Company's consolidated statement of operations. ASG also received the right to purchase up to approximately 2.2 million additional nonredeemable convertible preferred shares of Arvelle at a price of €0.00001 per share upon a potential future second closing under the Subscription Agreement. In May 2020, ASG fully exercised this right and purchased the approximately 2.2 million additional nonredeemable convertible preferred shares upon the closing of the second financing under the Subscription Agreement, which was recorded at a fair value of $2.2 million and was capitalized as a long-term investment in the Company's unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheet and recorded to other non-operating income in the Company's unaudited condensed consolidated statement of operations. The Company accounts for its investment in Arvelle in accordance with the provisions of ASC 321, "Investments - Equity Securities", and elected to use the measurement alternative therein. The investment will be remeasured upon future observable price change(s) in orderly transaction(s) or upon impairment, if any.
Note 5—Leases
The Company adopted the provisions of Topic 842 on April 1, 2019 using the effective date as its date of initial application and applied the optional modified retrospective transition method. Comparative periods were not restated. For leases that commenced prior to April 1, 2019, the Company elected the following package of practical expedients when assessing the transition impact: (1) not to reassess whether any expired or existing contracts are or contain leases; (2) not to reassess the lease classification for any expired or existing leases; and (3) not to reassess initial direct costs for any existing leases. The Company also elected to: (1) use the total lease term in its initial incremental borrowing rate calculation; (2) combine its lease and non-lease components and account for them as a single lease component; and (3) not apply the use of hindsight in determining the lease term when considering lessee options to extend or terminate the lease and to purchase the underlying asset. Upon adoption, the Company recorded corresponding aggregate operating lease right-of-use assets and operating lease liabilities of $3.0 million and $2.4 million, respectively, including $0.6 million of prepaid rent previously classified within other non-current assets in the Company’s consolidated balance sheet that was reclassified to operating lease right-of-use assets. Operating right-of-use assets and obligations were recognized based on the present value of remaining lease payments over the lease term using an incremental borrowing rate of 12.9%. As the Company’s operating leases do not provide an implicit rate, estimated incremental borrowing rates were used based on the information available at the adoption date in determining the present value of lease payments. Operating lease expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Variable lease costs such as common area costs and other operating costs are expensed as incurred. Leases with an initial term of 12 months or less are not recorded within the Company's unaudited condensed balance sheet. In addition, the Company reviews agreements at inception to determine if they include a lease, and when they do, uses its incremental borrowing rate or implicit interest rate to determine the present value of the future lease payments.
The Company leases office facilities in New York, New York, Durham, North Carolina and Princeton, New Jersey, with corresponding lease terms ending in January 2021, November 2022, and October 2020, respectively, whereby the last payment under the lease agreement for the office facility in New York, New York is due in September 2020. These leases are classified as operating leases in accordance with the provisions of Topic 842. The aggregate weighted-average remaining lease term and aggregate weighted-average discount rate were 0.9 years and 12.9%, respectively, for the Company's contractual rent obligations for operating leases as of June 30, 2020.

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During the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, the Company incurred $0.5 million and $0.4 million, respectively, in rent expense associated with contractual rent obligations for its operating leases. During the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, the Company paid $0.5 million and $0.4 million, respectively, related to its contractual rent obligations associated with operating lease right-of-use assets. The following table provides a reconciliation of the Company's remaining undiscounted contractual rent obligations due within each respective fiscal year ending March 31 to the operating lease liabilities recognized as of June 30, 2020 (in thousands):
Fiscal Year Ending March 31,Amount
2021$484  
202246  
202331  
2024  
2025  
Thereafter  
Total undiscounted payments561  
Less: Present value adjustment(26) 
Present value of future payments$535  
Note 6—Accrued Expenses
As of June 30, 2020, and March 31, 2020, accrued expenses consisted of the following (in thousands):
June 30, 2020March 31, 2020
Research and development expenses$6,789  $6,951  
Salaries, bonuses and other compensation expenses1,142  2,521  
Legal expenses335  704  
Other expenses683  1,143  
    Total accrued expenses$8,949  $11,319  
Note 7—Long-term Debt
In April 2020, the Company fully prepaid $15.7 million of outstanding principal, together with $0.3 million of accrued interest, fees and other amounts, due under its loan and security agreement (the "Loan Agreement") with Hercules Capital, Inc. ("Hercules"), which was accounted for as an extinguishment of debt with a corresponding loss of approximately $0.5 million included within interest expense during the three months ended June 30, 2020. In connection with the prepayment, the credit facility and Loan Agreement with Hercules were terminated, and all obligations, liens and security interests under the Loan Agreement were released, discharged and satisfied.
Note 8—Related Party Transactions
(A) Services Agreements:
In October 2014, and as amended in October 2015, February 2017 and June 2019, AGT, ASI and ASG entered into a services agreement (the "RSI Services Agreement") with Roivant Sciences, Inc. ("RSI"), a wholly owned subsidiary of RSL, under which RSI agreed to provide certain administrative and research and development services to AGT, ASI and ASG. Under the RSI Services Agreement, expenses of $53 thousand and $28 thousand were incurred during the three months ended June 30, 2020 and June 30, 2019, respectively, inclusive of a predetermined mark-up.
(B) RSL Financing Participation:
In February 2020, the Company issued and sold 16,631,336 common shares and pre-funded warrants to purchase up to 3,301,998 common shares in a follow-on public offering, including 2,600,000 common shares sold pursuant to the exercise of the underwriters' option to purchase additional shares, at an offering price of $3.75 per common share and $3.74999 per pre-funded warrant, including 5,333,333 shares issued and sold to RSL. The net proceeds to the Company were approximately $70.8 million, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering expenses incurred (see Note 9(B)).

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Note 9—Shareholders' Equity
(A) Overview:
The Company’s Memorandum of Association, filed on October 31, 2014 in Bermuda, authorized the issuance of one class of shares. The total number of shares authorized was 1,000,000,000 with a par value per share of $0.00001 at June 30, 2020. A 1-for-8 reverse share split of the Company's outstanding common stock was effected on May 8, 2019 as approved by the Company's Board of Directors and a majority of its shareholders, which reduced the number of common shares issued and outstanding from approximately 182.2 million to 22.8 million as of March 31, 2019. As such, all references to share and per share amounts in these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes have been retroactively restated to reflect the 1-for-8 reverse share split, except for the authorized number of shares of the Company's common stock and the par value per share, which were not affected.
(B) Transactions:
During the three months ended June 30, 2020 and June 30, 2019, expenses of $53 thousand and $28 thousand, respectively, were incurred by RSI on behalf of the Company and were recorded as capital contributions (see Note 8(A)).
In February 2020, the Company issued and sold 16,631,336 common shares and pre-funded warrants to purchase up to 3,301,998 common shares in a follow-on public offering, including 2,600,000 common shares sold pursuant to the exercise of the underwriters' option to purchase additional shares, at an offering price of $3.75 per common share and $3.74999 per pre-funded warrant, including 5,333,333 shares issued and sold to RSL. The net proceeds to the Company were approximately $70.8 million, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering expenses incurred (see Note 8(B)).The pre-funded warrants do not expire and are immediately exercisable except that the pre-funded warrants cannot be exercised by the holder if, after giving effect thereto, the holder would beneficially own more than 9.99% of the Company’s common stock, subject to certain exceptions. The pre-funded warrants are classified as equity in accordance with ASC 480, "Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity", and the fair value of the pre-funded warrants was recorded as a credit to additional paid-in capital and is not subject to remeasurement. As of June 30, 2020, none of the pre-funded warrants had been exercised.
During the three months ended June 30, 2020, the Company engaged SVB Leerink LLC as its agent to sell the Company's common shares from time to time through an at-the-market equity offering program. SVB Leerink LLC receives compensation for its services in an amount equal to 3% of the gross proceeds of any of the Company's common shares sold. As of June 30, 2020, the Company sold approximately 1.4 million common shares for total proceeds of approximately $4.3 million, net of brokerage fees, under this program, and subsequent to June 30, 2020, the Company has sold approximately 1.1 million common shares for total proceeds of approximately $3.3 million, net of brokerage fees (see Note 12).
Note 10—Share-Based Compensation
In March 2015, the Company adopted its 2015 Equity Incentive Plan, which was amended and restated in June 2017 by its Board of Directors and became effective upon shareholder approval in August 2017 (the "2015 Plan"). A 1-for-8 reverse share split of the Company's outstanding common stock was effected on May 8, 2019 as approved by the Company's Board of Directors and a majority of its shareholders. The reverse share split reduced the number of shares authorized for issuance, the number of shares available for issuance, and the number of options outstanding under the 2015 Plan from approximately 24.8 million to 3.1 million, from approximately 8.4 million to 1.0 million, and from approximately 15.4 million to 1.9 million, respectively, as of March 31, 2019. As such, all references to share and per share amounts in these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes have been retroactively restated to reflect the 1-for-8 reverse share split, except for the authorized number of shares of the Company's common stock and the par value per share, which were not affected. In April 2020, the number of common shares authorized for issuance under the 2015 Plan increased automatically to approximately 5.6 million common shares in accordance with the terms of the 2015 Plan. Under the 2015 Plan at June 30, 2020, a total of 2.1 million common shares were available for future grant, RSUs for approximately 0.8 million common shares were outstanding, and options to purchase approximately 2.3 million common shares were outstanding with a weighted-average exercise price of $12.73 per share.
Stock options granted under the 2015 Plan provide option holders, if approved by the Board of Directors, the right to exercise their options prior to vesting. In the event that an option holder exercises the unvested portion of any option, such unvested portion will be subject to a repurchase option held by the Company at the lower of (1) the fair market value of its common shares on the date of repurchase and (2) the exercise price of the options. Any common shares underlying such unvested portion will continue to vest in accordance with the original vesting schedule of the option.

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(A) Equity Awards:
During the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, the Company granted options to purchase a total of 0.4 million and 1.3 million, respectively, of its common shares, with weighted-average exercise prices of $3.45 and $8.45, respectively, and estimated grant date fair values of $1.1 million and $6.4 million, respectively, under the 2015 Plan. Share-based compensation expense is included in research and development and general and administrative expenses in the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations. Time-based stock options granted to the Company's employees vest over a period of four years with 25% of the common shares underlying the option vesting on the first anniversary of the vesting commencement date and the remainder vesting in 12 quarterly installments thereafter, subject to continuing service. Initial stock options granted to the Company's non-employee directors vest in equal installments on the first, second and third anniversaries of the vesting commencement date, and stock options subsequently granted annually to the Company's non-employee directors vest fully on the first anniversary of the vesting commencement date, each subject to continuous service. The stock options granted to employees during the three months ended June 30, 2019 include options with market-based performance conditions to purchase 0.3 million common shares, with a weighted-average exercise price of $8.48 per share and corresponding estimated grant date fair value of $1.0 million which was estimated using Monte Carlo Simulation methods under the income approach. There were no options with market-based performance conditions granted during the three months ended June 30, 2020. As of June 30, 2020, options with market-based performance conditions to purchase 0.4 million common shares at a weighted-average exercise price of $10.66 per share were outstanding. The market-based performance options vest based on the trading price for the Company’s common shares exceeding certain closing price thresholds. As of June 30, 2020, stock options with market-based performance conditions to purchase approximately 19 thousand common shares with a weighted-average exercise price of $11.68 per share were outstanding and vested.
During the three months ended June 30, 2020, the Company granted RSUs for a total of 0.7 million common shares with an aggregate grant date fair value of $2.6 million to its employees under the 2015 Plan, with the RSUs granted scheduled to vest in three equal annual installments commencing on the first anniversary of the vesting commencement date, subject to continuing service.
The Company recorded total share-based compensation expense of $1.6 million and $2.0 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively, related to options and RSUs granted to its employees, directors and consultants. The share-based compensation expense was recorded as research and development and general and administrative expenses in the Company's unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations. At June 30, 2020, total unrecognized compensation expense related to non-vested outstanding equity awards related to options and RSUs granted to its employees, directors and consultants was $8.4 million, which is expected to be recognized over the remaining weighted-average service period of 2.47 years.
(B) Share-Based Compensation for Related Parties:
(1) RSL Common Share Awards and Options:
Certain employees of the Company have been granted RSL common share awards and options. The Company recorded share-based compensation expense of $25 thousand and $0.1 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively, related to these awards.
Note 11—Commitments and Contingencies
As of June 30, 2020, the Company had entered into commitments under the Oxford Agreement (see Note 3(A)), the UMMS Agreement (see Note 3(C)), the services agreements with RSI and RSG (see Note 8(A)), and agreements to rent office space. In addition, the Company has entered into services agreements with third parties for pharmaceutical manufacturing and research activities in the normal course of business, which can generally be terminated by the Company with 30 days written notice, unless otherwise indicated. See Note 5 for information regarding rent expense incurred, and remaining contractual rent obligations due, in connection with the Company's outstanding contractual rent obligations.
In June 2019, the Company entered into a manufacturing services agreement with a third-party for the manufacture of cGMP grade viral vector. The parties have agreed that the Company’s obligation under the agreement is €0.9 million which will be paid by November 2020, at which point the agreement will terminate.
The Company has the right to terminate the Oxford Agreement at any time upon two months' advance written notice prior to the first commercial sale of a product, or for a specified period of advance written notice after the first commercial sale of a product. Either party may terminate the Oxford Agreement for the other party's uncured material breach or with respect to a failure to make a required payment.
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The Company has the right to terminate the UMMS Agreement at any time upon 90 days' advance written notice to UMMS. Either party may terminate the UMMS Agreement for the other party's uncured material breach upon 60 days' advance written notice, including in the event that UMMS reasonably determines the Company has not fulfilled its diligence obligations.
Note 12—Subsequent Events
Subsequent to June 30, 2020, the Company has sold approximately 1.1 million common shares for total proceeds of approximately $3.3 million, net of brokerage fees, through SVB Leerink LLC.
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Item 2.                                                         Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows should be read in conjunction with (1) the interim unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, and (2) the audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto and management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") on June 10, 2020. Unless the context requires otherwise, references in this report to "Axovant", the "Company," "we," "us," and "our" refer to Axovant Gene Therapies Ltd. and its subsidiaries.
This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"). These statements are often identified by the use of words such as "anticipate," "believe," "continue," "could," "estimate," "expect," "intend," "may," "plan," "project," "will," "would" or the negative or plural of these words or similar expressions or variations, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. We cannot assure you that the events and circumstances reflected in the forward-looking statements will be achieved or occur and actual results could differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements appearing in a number of places throughout this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q include, but are not limited to, statements regarding our intentions, beliefs, projections, outlook, analyses or current expectations concerning, among other things:
the success and timing of our ongoing development and potential commercialization of our product candidates;
our relationships under our license agreements;
the success of our interactions with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") and international regulatory authorities;
the anticipated start dates, durations and completion dates of our ongoing and future nonclinical studies and clinical trials, as well as subsequent portions or cohorts of our ongoing clinical trials;
the receipt of approvals or endorsements by data monitoring or other committees necessary for commencement or continuation of clinical trials; 
the anticipated designs of our future clinical studies;
anticipated future regulatory submissions and the timing of and our ability to obtain and maintain regulatory approval for our product candidates;
the rate and degree of market acceptance and clinical utility of any approved product candidate;
our ability to identify and in-license or acquire additional product candidates;
our commercialization, marketing and manufacturing capabilities and strategy;
continued service of our executive officers or other key scientific or management personnel;
our ability to obtain, maintain and enforce intellectual property rights for our product candidates;
our anticipated future cash position;
our estimates regarding our results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, capital requirements, prospects, growth and strategies;
our ability to maintain and operate our business in light of the COVID-19 pandemic;
the success of competing therapies that are or may become available; and
our stated objective of building the world's leading gene therapy company for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.
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We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events, including the responses we expect from the FDA and other regulatory authorities and financial trends that we believe may affect our financial condition, results of operations, business strategy, nonclinical studies and clinical trials and financial needs. Such forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks, uncertainties, assumptions and other factors known and unknown that could cause actual results and the timing of certain events to differ materially from future results expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, those identified herein, and those discussed in the section titled "Risk Factors" set forth in Part II, Item 1A of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and in our other filings with the SEC. These risks are not exhaustive. You should not rely upon forward-looking statements as predictions of future events. Furthermore, such forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this report. New risk factors emerge from time to time and it is not possible for our management to predict all risk factors, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements. Except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of such statements.
In addition, statements that "we believe" and similar statements reflect our beliefs and opinions on the relevant subject. These statements are based upon information available to us as of the date of this report, and while we believe such information forms a reasonable basis for such statements, such information may be limited or incomplete, and our statements should not be read to indicate that we have conducted an exhaustive inquiry into, or review of, all potentially available relevant information. These statements are inherently uncertain, and investors are cautioned not to unduly rely upon these statements as predictions of future events.
Overview
We are a clinical-stage company focused on developing innovative gene therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. We currently have three clinical-stage programs: (i) the AXO-Lenti-PD program for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, which is comprised of the first generation ProSavin® in which 15 patients were previously dosed in a Phase 1/2 study, and the second generation AXO-Lenti-PD in which we have dosed two patients in Cohort 1 of the dose-escalation study and four patients in Cohort 2; (ii) the AXO-AAV-GM1 program for the treatment of GM1 gangliosidosis in which five patients have been dosed in the juvenile (Type II) low-dose cohort of stage 1, and we expect to continue to dose juvenile (Type II) patients in the higher dose cohort of the study and initiate the low-dose infantile (Type I) patients in calendar year 2020; and (iii) the AXO-AAV-GM2 program for the treatment of GM2 gangliosidosis (including Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases) in which two expanded access patients have been dosed and we expect to obtain investigational new drug ("IND") application clearance in calendar year 2020.
We are dedicated to realizing the potential of gene therapies to offer transformative patient outcomes in areas of high unmet medical need and extending the reach of gene therapies to highly prevalent neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease. We have assembled a portfolio of gene therapies in partnership with leading scientific institutions and have built a team with extensive experience in the gene therapy space. Our team pursues new innovations in vector design and delivery to optimize our investigational gene therapy products for safety, potency, durability, and immunologic response. We will continue to build integrated internal development capabilities from product development through commercialization and focus on accelerating the pace of product development in the clinic. As part of our ongoing business strategy, we continue to explore potential opportunities to acquire or license new product candidates as well as opportunities for partnership or collaboration on our existing products in development. Our vision is to build the world's leading gene therapy company for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases by progressing our current programs and identifying, developing and commercializing other novel gene therapy treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. We are continuing our corporate transformation to align corporate structure and governance with current and future business activity, and we intend to redomicile Axovant Gene Therapies Ltd. to Delaware from Bermuda by March 31, 2021, change its name and reduce significantly the number of subsidiaries.
COVID-19 Business Update
We are continuing to closely monitor the impact of the global COVID-19 pandemic on our business and are taking proactive efforts to protect the health and safety of our patients, study investigators and employees, as well as to maintain business continuity. Based on guidance issued by federal, state and local authorities, we transitioned to a remote work model for our employees, effective March 16, 2020. We believe that the measures we are implementing are appropriate, reflecting both regulatory and public health guidance, to maintain business continuity. We will continue to closely monitor and seek to comply with guidance from governmental authorities and adjust our activities as appropriate.
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In the conduct of our business activities, we are also taking actions designed to protect the safety and well-being of patients, healthcare workers and employees. For patients already enrolled in our clinical trials, we are working closely with clinical trial investigators and site staff to continue treatment in compliance with trial protocols and to uphold trial integrity, while working to observe government and institutional guidelines designed to safeguard the health and safety of patients, clinical trial investigators and site staff. We are continuing to evaluate clinical trial site initiations and patient enrollment on a case-by-case and patient-by-patient basis in coordination with clinical trial investigators and site staff. Some clinical trial sites, both within the United States and the United Kingdom, continue to screen patients in our clinical trials, and new patients are being enrolled when appropriate. These internal and external efforts have allowed us to continue progress across our clinical development programs, and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic to date has not resulted in a significant impact to our clinical development timelines previously provided. However, our clinical trial progression, dosing, patient enrollment and related activities may be delayed, and reporting of some clinical data may be incomplete or delayed if patients enrolled in our clinical trials are unable to fully participate in all necessary measurement protocols, due to prioritization of hospital resources toward the COVID-19 pandemic or concerns among patients about participating in clinical trials during a pandemic, or restrictions imposed by institutions or local, state or national governments, among other factors. While the COVID-19 pandemic has not resulted in a significant delay to our clinical development timelines to-date, the global pandemic of COVID-19 continues to evolve rapidly, and could materially impact our clinical development and any future commercialization timelines.
Our business could also be harmed by health epidemics wherever we have business operations, including operations of third-party manufacturers, contract research organizations ("CROs") and other third parties upon whom we rely. Axovant Sciences, Inc. is based in New York City, we have business operations in North Carolina and Basel, Switzerland, and certain of our contract manufacturers are located in Europe. We are also dependent on an international supply chain for products to be used in our clinical trials and, if approved by the regulatory authorities, for commercialization. While the COVID-19 pandemic has not adversely impacted our business operations, international supply chain, productivity or clinical development timelines to-date, the effects of executive orders issued by numerous U.S. state governments, including the State of New York and surrounding states, which have imposed continuing aggressive orders, health directives and recommendations to reduce the spread of the disease, including shelter-in-place directives and executive orders directing that all non-essential businesses close their physical operations, as well as our work-from home policies, may negatively impact productivity, disrupt our business or international supply chain and delay our clinical programs and timelines in the future, the magnitude of which will depend, in part, on the length and severity of the restrictions and other limitations on our ability to conduct our business in the ordinary course.
The spread of COVID-19 may also materially affect us economically in the future. While the potential economic impact brought by, and the duration of, COVID-19 may be difficult to assess or predict, a widespread pandemic could result in significant disruption of global financial markets, reducing our ability to access capital, which could in the future negatively affect our liquidity. In addition, a recession or market correction resulting from the spread of COVID-19 could harm our business and the value of our common shares.
The ultimate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic or a similar health epidemic is highly uncertain and subject to change. We do not yet know the full extent of potential delays or impacts on our business, our clinical trials, healthcare systems or the global economy as a whole. However, these effects could harm our operations, and we will continue to monitor the COVID-19 situation closely. For additional information about risks and uncertainties related to the COVID-19 pandemic that may impact our business, financial condition and results of operations, see the section titled “Risk Factors” under Part II, Item 1A in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.
Our Product Pipeline
The following table summarizes the status of our gene therapy development programs. Our wholly owned subsidiary, Axovant Sciences GmbH ("ASG"), holds global commercial rights to each of the following programs:
Gene Therapy ProgramClinical IndicationClinical Development Stage
AXO-Lenti-PDParkinson's diseasePhase 2
AXO-AAV-GM1GM1 gangliosidosisPhase 1/2
AXO-AAV-GM2 GM2 gangliosidosis (also Tay-Phase 1/2
Sachs and Sandhoff diseases)

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AXO-Lenti-PD Program
Overview
AXO-Lenti-PD is an in vivo lentiviral gene therapy investigational product candidate currently being developed as a potential one-time treatment of Parkinson’s disease. We licensed the worldwide development and commercialization rights to AXO-Lenti-PD and ProSavin from Oxford BioMedica (UK) Ltd. ("Oxford"), under an exclusive license agreement entered into in June 2018 (the "Oxford Agreement"). Currently, we have six years of data on 15 patients dosed in a Phase 1/2 clinical trial of ProSavin and 12-month data on two patients dosed in Cohort 1 of the Phase 2 clinical trial of the SUNRISE-PD study. We expect six-month data from the four patients dosed in Cohort 2 of the SUNRISE-PD study by the end of calendar year 2020.
AXO-Lenti-PD delivers a construct of three genes that encode the critical enzymes required for the biochemical synthesis of dopamine from endogenous tyrosine. The three enzymes are: Tyrosine Hydroxylase ("TH"), the enzyme that converts tyrosine to levodopa ("L-dopa"), Cyclohydrolase 1 ("CH1"), the rate-limiting enzyme for synthesis of Tetrahydrobiopterin ("BH4"), a critical cofactor for production of L-dopa, and Aromatic L-Amino Acid Decarboxylase ("AADC"), the enzyme that converts L-dopa to dopamine. AXO-Lenti-PD is delivered by a one-time stereotactic guided infusion into the putamen. We believe that delivery of all three of these genes will enable the continuous, tonic, endogenous synthesis of dopamine in this region of the brain that is deficient in dopamine, with a goal of improving motor function, reducing the burden of oral therapy and mitigating dyskinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease.
Dopamine deficiency plays a central role in Parkinson’s disease and we believe that restoring the ability to synthesize dopamine in patients will offer lasting improvement in the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Oxford previously conducted a Phase 1/2 clinical study with ProSavin. In this clinical trial, ProSavin was observed to have a favorable long-term safety profile and demonstrated effects on motor function for six years, supporting proof-of-concept. AXO-Lenti-PD delivers a re-engineered construct relative to ProSavin that has been demonstrated to increase dopamine production in nonclinical studies.
Parkinson’s Disease
Parkinson’s disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder that primarily results in progressive and debilitating motor symptoms. It is estimated that up to 1,000,000 people in the United States and 7,000,000 to 10,000,000 people worldwide suffer from Parkinson’s disease. It typically develops between the ages of 55 and 65 years and affects approximately 1% of people 60 years of age. The underlying factors that result in the development of Parkinson’s disease are largely unknown. However, Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease that results in reduced levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the striatum, a region in the brain responsible for motor control. Dopamine is essential for movement, and low levels of dopamine in patients with Parkinson’s disease are believed to result in the typical motor symptoms of the disease, including hypo- and bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, and postural instability.
The treatment of Parkinson’s disease is currently limited to symptomatic treatments, as no therapies have proven effective in altering the course of the disease or addressing the underlying pathophysiological processes. The mainstay of treatment typically involves the daily administration of oral L-dopa, the precursor to dopamine. While L-dopa is effective in controlling motor symptoms early in the disease, progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and chronic L-dopa therapy are believed to contribute to the "wearing off" of L-dopa’s efficacy in the more advanced stages of the disease. Patients become increasingly less responsive to oral L-dopa therapy and require higher doses to manage their symptoms. More advanced Parkinson’s disease patients often begin to experience "on-off" motor fluctuations, characterized by unpredictable "OFF periods" of reduced mobility and increased rigidity and tremor. In addition, abnormal and involuntary movements known as dyskinesias may occur at higher L-dopa blood levels. Approximately 10% of patients per year develop "on-off" motor fluctuations after starting L-dopa therapy.
As Parkinson’s disease progresses, other therapies can be used in combination with L-dopa and include dopamine receptor agonists and inhibitors of enzymes related to dopamine metabolism, such as monoamine oxidase B ("MAO-B") and catechol O-methyl transferase ("COMT"). These therapies aim to further improve overall dopaminergic function. Patient-friendly treatment options for motor fluctuations in advanced Parkinson’s disease are limited. Subcutaneous injections of the dopamine agonist apomorphine are used for the acute treatment of OFF periods. Duopa/Duodopa is an enteral suspension of L-dopa and the peripheral AADC inhibitor carbidopa that is continuously administered over the course of the day through a surgically-placed percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with jejunal ("PEG-J") tube to reduce fluctuations in L-dopa blood levels. Deep-Brain Stimulation ("DBS"), a procedure in which electrodes are surgically placed in the basal ganglia, either in the subthalamic nucleus or internal globus pallidus, is another option for advanced Parkinson’s disease. Through an impulse generator, electrical stimuli are delivered to the brain to modulate neural signals within these target regions. It remains unclear exactly how DBS improves the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Both Duopa/Duodopa and DBS require indwelling hardware - a PEG-J tube, or electrodes, leads, and impulse generator - respectively.

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Earlier-Generation Product Candidate: ProSavin (OXB-101)
ProSavin, the earlier-generation gene therapy candidate to AXO-Lenti-PD, delivered the same three genes (AADC, TH, and CH1) as AXO-Lenti-PD in the same lentiviral vector, but in a less optimized payload configuration. AXO-Lenti-PD was the result of multifactorial experimentation to optimize the payload configuration to improve endogenous dopamine production. The initial Phase 1/2 clinical trial of ProSavin was completed in 2012 and long-term follow-up is ongoing.
Nonclinical Studies for ProSavin
In nonclinical studies in non-human primate models of Parkinson's disease, ProSavin was shown to be well-tolerated, restored striatal dopamine production to approximately 50% of normal levels and improved motor function without associated dyskinesias (p-value<0.05). ProSavin was observed to improve Parkinson's disease symptoms and clinical disease severity in the same non-human primate model, with a durable response seen up to 12 months (p-value<0.05 at all time points beyond week 4). One of the ProSavin treated non-human primates was continued on the study and exhibited a sustained motor improvement until the study was concluded at 44 months. Also, in non-human primate models, treatment with ProSavin plus oral levodopa significantly reduced dyskinesias (p<0.05) compared to an empty vector plus oral levodopa, with effects sustained out to eight weeks. Nonclinical study data did not reveal adverse reactions nor findings with potential impact on patient safety and provided pertinent data on the optimal method of delivery in the clinic. ProSavin was also observed to be well tolerated when co-administered with L-dopa and apomorphine, indicating that it can be used in conjunction with these commonly used Parkinson's disease medications.
In summary, these experiments were determined to demonstrate the long-term safety of therapeutic doses of ProSavin as well as significant efficacy to improve measures of movement and reduce dyskinesias in animal models. These results supported the initiation of clinical trials for ProSavin.
Phase 1/2 Clinical Trial of ProSavin
ProSavin was evaluated for safety and efficacy in a Phase 1/2 study in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease by Oxford. In this study, ProSavin was observed to be well-tolerated with sustained improvements on motor function as measured by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale ("UPDRS") Part III (motor) score in the state "OFF" levodopa medication, which we refer to as UPDRS Part III "OFF." The Phase 1/2 clinical trial was conducted at sites in the United Kingdom ("U.K.") and France on a total of 15 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. Three target dose levels of ProSavin were assessed in four patient cohorts: Low Dose: 1.9 × 107 transducing units ("TU") in Cohort 1 (n=3); Mid Dose: 4.0 × 107 TU in Cohorts 2a (n=3) and 2b (n=3); High Dose: 1.0 × 108 TU in Cohort 3 (n=6). Cohorts 2b and 3 underwent a modified delivery method to increase the rate of delivery of the viral vector. The primary endpoints were the number and severity of adverse events as well as the UPDRS Part III "OFF" scores at six months after gene therapy administration. No serious adverse events related to ProSavin or the surgical procedure were reported. Reported adverse events were generally mild and related to either Parkinson's disease progression or L-dopa-induced dyskinesias that were ameliorated with reduction of L-dopa administration. The most common adverse events in the first 12 months were dyskinesia (n=11 subjects), "on-off" motor fluctuations (n=9), headache (n=4), and akinesia (n=3).
Across all patients, mean UPDRS Part III "OFF" scores were significantly improved at six months (33% reduction, p-value=0.0001) and 12 months (31% reduction, p-value=0.0001) compared to baseline. In a long term follow up safety study for the patients from the Phase 1/2 study, ProSavin has been observed to show a favorable long-term safety profile and demonstrated positive effects on motor function for over six years. Sustained improvement was seen through six years of follow-up and the long-term follow-up study is still ongoing (10 years exposure in the earliest subject). Clinical data from this study were published in The Lancet in 2014 and long-term follow-up data from this study were published in Human Gene Therapy Clinical Development in 2018.
Next-Generation Product Candidate: AXO-Lenti-PD
AXO-Lenti-PD is a re-engineered gene therapy product candidate that was selected following multifactorial experimentation to optimize the payload configuration of ProSavin to increase endogenous dopamine production. The modifications included a different ordering of the genes, the fusion of TH and CH1 with a flexible linker, and the removal of a genetic control element between TH and AADC. Both ProSavin and AXO-Lenti-PD utilize the same exact fourth generation lentiviral vector. We believe these changes lead to more balanced stoichiometry of gene expression and colocalization of enzymatic activity. The targeted net result is increased dopamine production in transduced cells.

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Nonclinical Studies for AXO-Lenti-PD
In vitro experiments with AXO-Lenti-PD showed up to 10-fold increases in dopamine + L-dopa production over ProSavin. In vivo experiments in non-human primate models showed increased AADC activity in the brain with AXO-Lenti-PD compared to ProSavin as measured by positron emission tomography ("PET") scans. Functionally, in non-human primate models at approximately 1/5th of the dose, AXO-Lenti-PD demonstrated a similar level of improvement in spontaneous locomotor activity compared to ProSavin. A recent placebo-controlled study in a non-human primate model of Parkinson’s disease published in Molecular Therapy: Methods and Clinical Development compared two doses of AXO-Lenti-PD against control-group animals receiving a placebo. The study demonstrated statistically significant differences in Parkinson's disease clinical response scores at six months in this diseased-animal model (p<0.0002 for AXO-Lenti-PD compared to control), dose-dependent increases in PET signaling using a 6-[(18)F]fluoro-m-tyrosine radiotracer (p<0.001 for AXO-Lenti-PD compared to control), and dose-dependent increases in gene expression for AADC, TH, and CH1 in transduced striatal tissue. We believe these data provide evidence that AXO-Lenti-PD may have greater potency compared to ProSavin in terms of dopamine production, enzymatic activity and functional improvement in animal models of Parkinson's disease.
SUNRISE-PD Phase 2 Clinical Trial of AXO-Lenti-PD
In the fourth quarter of calendar year 2018, we initiated the Phase 2 clinical trial of the SUNRISE-PD study in the U.K. The SUNRISE-PD study is currently enrolling patients in the U.K., and we plan to file an IND application with the FDA to support enrollment of patients in the United States. Additionally, we have filed a Clinical Trial Application to support local enrollment in France.
The design of the SUNRISE-PD study is an open label dose-escalation portion studying multiple potential dose levels. Once the optimal dose has been determined in the dose-escalation study, a Phase 2 sham-controlled study will be conducted with patients randomized either to an active group receiving the optimal dose as determined in the SUNRISE-PD study, or a control group undergoing an imitation "sham" surgical procedure. Assuming successful completion of the dose-escalation portion of the study and successful development of a suspension-based manufacturing process, we expect to initiate the randomized, sham-controlled Phase 2 study in calendar year 2021.
The Phase 2 blinded, sham-controlled study is evaluating the safety and tolerability of AXO-Lenti-PD as well as assessing efficacy using clinical measures of motor function, patient diaries and biomarkers. We expect the primary endpoint of the double-blind, randomized, sham-controlled study to be assessed at six months and, in addition to the safety assessment, may include data from Hauser patient diaries, the UPDRS Part III and Part II "OFF" scores and other efficacy measures being assessed in the study.
In January 2020, we reported 12-month data from Cohort 1 in the open-label, dose-escalation SUNRISE-PD Phase 2 study. AXO-Lenti-PD was observed to be generally well tolerated, with no serious adverse events attributable to the gene therapy. At month 12, the patients experienced an average improvement from baseline in UPDRS III (motor) score, in the state "OFF" levodopa therapy, of 22 points, representing an average improvement of 37% from baseline. Individual patient improvements from baseline at 12 months of 20 points and 24 points were observed (from 58 to 38 and from 60 to 36, respectively). Previously, at six months post-dosing, these patients demonstrated an average 17-point change from baseline, or 29% improvement, on the same scale. Improvement in the UPDRS Part III “OFF” score in Cohort 1 and Cohort 2 exhibited evidence of dose response when compared to the low (n="3"), medium (n="6"), and high (n="6") dose cohorts of ProSavin that were previously evaluated in a separate Phase 1/2 study at six and 12 months, as follows:
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https://cdn.kscope.io/49e363de33bd298169a2578cb841bd60-axon-20200630_g1.jpg
These data are based on a cross-trial comparison and not a head-to-head clinical trial. As a result, these data may not be directly comparable.
In addition, the patients experienced an average improvement of approximately 13 points from baseline on the UPDRS Part II (activities of daily living) "OFF" score at 12 months post-dosing, representing an average improvement of 44% from baseline, and an average improvement of 3 points from baseline on the UPDRS Part IV (complications of therapy) "OFF" score at six months post-dosing. The 12-month timepoint is considered an important timeframe for assessment of therapeutic response, differentiation from sham/placebo effect, and durability of gene therapy in Parkinson’s disease.
Only one of two patients in Cohort 1 was able to record a Hauser diary. Improvements were observed across various diary measures from baseline to 12 months for the single patient. The Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 score index, a well-validated quality of life measure in Parkinson’s disease, demonstrated an average 15-point change from baseline for the patients in Cohort 1, or 30% improvement from baseline to 12 months.
We dosed the first patient in Cohort 2 of the SUNRISE-PD clinical study in April 2019 and the last (fourth) patient in February 2020 with six-month data from the patients dosed in Cohort 2 expected by the end of calendar year 2020. The target dose being tested in Cohort 2 is 1.4×107 TU, which is three times higher than the dose used in Cohort 1. At six months, the first patient in Cohort 2 demonstrated a 22-point improvement from baseline on the UPDRS Part III "OFF" score, compared to a 17-point average improvement for patients in Cohort 1 at six months.
AXO-AAV-GM1 and AXO-AAV-GM2 Programs
Overview
We are developing AXO-AAV-GM1 and AXO-AAV-GM2 as potential one-time disease-modifying treatments for GM1 and GM2 gangliosidosis (including Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease), respectively.
GM1 Gangliosidosis and GM2 Gangliosidosis (Including Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff Diseases)
GM1 gangliosidosis is a rare, inherited neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the accumulation of GM1 ganglioside. This accumulation occurs due to a defect in the galactosidase beta 1 ("GLB1") gene. The GLB1 gene codes for the β-galactosidase ("β-gal") enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of GM1 gangliosides. Impaired β-gal activity results in the toxic accumulation of GM1 gangliosides, causing the progressive destruction of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord and early death. GM1 gangliosidosis is uniformly fatal, and there are no disease-modifying treatment options. The estimated incidence for GM1 gangliosidosis is approximately one in 100,000 live births worldwide. In 2019, we collaborated with the National Institutes of Health (“NIH”) to publish a comprehensive retrospective study characterizing the natural history of Type I GM1 gangliosidosis in Molecular Genetics and Metabolism (Lang et.al., 2019). This paper describes a rapidly progressive clinical course of Type I GM1 gangliosidosis, in which almost all patients experience significant multi-organ system dysfunction and neurodevelopmental regression between six and 18 months of age.
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GM2 gangliosidosis, also known as Tay-Sachs or Sandhoff diseases, is a rare, inherited neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder characterized by buildup of GM2 ganglioside in lysosomes. Defects in the hexosaminidase subunit alpha ("HEXA") gene (leading to Tay-Sachs disease) and hexosaminidase subunit beta ("HEXB") gene (leading to Sandhoff disease) cause deficiencies in beta-hexosaminidase A ("Hex A") enzyme activity. Hex A enzyme deficiency leads to progressive accumulation of GM2 gangliosides in the central nervous system ("CNS") with ensuing neurodegeneration. Both Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease are characterized by progressive nervous system dysfunction, resulting in marked cognitive and physical impairment. Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases result in approximately 50% mortality by three and a half years of age and 75% mortality by five years of age. Currently there are no disease-modifying treatment options for either Tay-Sachs disease or Sandhoff disease, and management is limited to symptomatic treatment. The estimated incidence for Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases is approximately one in 150,000 live births worldwide.
The estimated incidence for the combination of GM1 gangliosidosis, Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases is approximately one in 60,000 live births worldwide. We estimate that there are between approximately 600 and 1,000 patients with GM1 gangliosidosis, Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases in the United States and European Union combined. These diseases, in the severe form, reduce life expectancy to two to four years.
AXO-AAV-GM1
AXO-AAV-GM1 is an investigational gene therapy currently being developed as a potential one-time disease modifying treatment for GM1 gangliosidosis. The program utilizes an adeno-associated virus ("AAV") vector to deliver a functional copy of the GLB1 gene with the goals of restoring β-gal enzyme activity in the CNS and reducing GM1 ganglioside accumulation, to ultimately improve neurological function and extend survival. The therapy is administered intravenously and utilizes the AAV9 capsid, which has been shown to cross the blood-brain barrier. Intravenous administration has the potential to broadly transduce the CNS and peripheral tissues, as well as treat peripheral manifestations of the disease. We licensed exclusive worldwide rights for the development and commercialization of AXO-AAV-GM1 from the University of Massachusetts Medical School ("UMMS") in December 2018. In November 2019, we announced that the FDA had granted orphan drug designation for AXO-AAV-GM1.
Preclinical studies in GM1 murine and feline models have supported AXO-AAV-GM1's ability to improve β-gal enzyme activity, reduce GM1 ganglioside accumulation, improve neuromuscular function, and extend survival. Magnetic resonance imaging ("MRI") of GM1 feline models treated with other GM1 gene therapy demonstrated substantially normal brain architecture through at least two years of age, as compared with untreated GM1 feline models.
AXO-AAV-GM1 is currently being evaluated in an IND overseen by the NIH. We presented an update from the first child dosed with AXO-AAV-GM1 in the fourth quarter of calendar year 2019, who was observed to have clinically significant improvements from baseline gene transfer to six month follow-up based on neurological exam, the Vineland-3 scale, Clinical Global Impression assessments, and nutritional status. The Vineland-3 scale is an individually administered measure of adaptive behavior that is widely used to assess individuals with intellectual, developmental, and other disabilities. In addition, AXO-AAV-GM1 was observed to be generally well tolerated with four treatment emergent adverse events, of which two were considered possibly related (increased Fibrin D dimer and increased AST, both of which resolved with no clinical sequelae), and no reports of serious adverse events related to the investigational gene therapy or intravenous administration of the vector. We have completed the enrollment and dosing of the five Type II patients in the low-dose cohort in Stage 1 of the registrational study of both Type I and Type II GM1 patients and expect initial data on the first cohort to be available during the fourth quarter of calendar year 2020. An IND amendment was cleared to expand the registrational study protocol to include infantile (Type I) GM1 patients, the population most severely affected by the disease, and to evaluate a higher dose level for both Type I and Type II patients. In the second half of calendar year 2020, we expect to initiate dosing in the high-dose cohort of Type II patients and the low-dose cohort of Type I patients in Stage 1 of the AXO-AAV-GM1 clinical program.
AXO-AAV-GM2
AXO-AAV-GM2 is an investigational gene therapy that we are developing as a potential one-time disease modifying treatment for GM2 gangliosidosis (including Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease). The AXO-AAV-GM2 program utilizes AAV dual vectors to deliver functional copies of both the HEXA gene and the HEXB gene, with the goal of restoring normal Hex A enzyme function in the CNS. AXO-AAV-GM2 is administered directly to the brain and CNS and utilizes the neurotropic AAVrh.8 capsid. The HEXA and HEXB genes will be delivered in a 1:1 ratio using separate AAvrh.8 vectors. As part of the AXO-AAV-GM2 program, we are also exploring a next-generation gene therapy that would utilize a bicistronic vector to deliver both the HEXA and HEXB genes in a single vector using the AAV9 capsid for systemic intravenous administration. We licensed exclusive worldwide rights for the development and commercialization of AXO-AAV-GM2 from UMMS in December 2018.
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Administration of AXO-AAV-GM2 in the Sandhoff mouse model showed increases in Hex A enzyme, reductions of GM2 ganglioside in the brain, and improvements in motor coordination. Extension of survival was also observed in the Sandhoff mouse model, with increases in survival in a dose-dependent manner. Patients with infantile Tay-Sachs disease, late-infantile or juvenile disease, and adult disease have been shown to have less than 0.1%, approximately 0.5%, and between 2% and 4% of normal Hex A activity, respectively. In addition, patients with infantile Tay-Sachs disease, late-infantile or juvenile disease, and adult disease have a median survival time from birth of three to four, 10 to 15, and over 18 years, respectively. Hex A activity of between 5% and 10% or more of normal is believed to be compatible with a disease-free life. We believe that the restoration of Hex A activity to 0.5% of normal activity could represent a clinically meaningful effect. AXO-AAV-GM2 is currently being evaluated in two patients under an expanded access IND overseen by UMMS. Initial observations suggested that AXO-AAV-GM2 was generally well-tolerated and associated with improvement in bioactivity outcomes. In addition, data suggested attainment of normal neurodevelopmental milestones and improvement in myelination on brain MRI.
We submitted an IND to the FDA in late calendar year 2019 to support the initiation of our registrational clinical trial in patients with GM2 gangliosidosis. Following the review of the IND, the FDA did not raise concerns related to animal toxicology or safety from the investigator-sponsored study. Rather, due to chemistry, manufacturing and controls and device-related questions posed by the FDA, the FDA placed the IND on clinical hold. In January 2020, we provided responses to the questions posed by the FDA. Based on the feedback from the FDA, we expect to obtain IND clearance for the AXO-AAV-GM2 trial to be initiated in calendar year 2020.
Patient #1
AXO-AAV-GM2 is currently being evaluated in two patients under the expanded access IND overseen by UMMS. The first patient was dosed in November 2018. In March 2019, October 2019 and May 2020, the three-month, six-month and 12-month data were reported from the first patient, a 30-month-old with advanced infantile Tay-Sachs disease, who received a total dose of 1.0×1014 vg of AXO-AAV-GM2 administered into the cisterna magna (75% of vector) and lumbar spinal canal (25% of vector) only. Due to the patient's advanced disease, a co-delivered intrathalamic injection of AXO-AAV-GM2 was not administered.
AXO-AAV-GM2 was observed to be generally well-tolerated with no reports of serious adverse events ("SAE" or "SAEs") related to the investigational gene therapy as of either the three-month, six-month or twelve-month visits. No clinically relevant laboratory abnormalities were observed following administration. Within the safety parameters that were summarized by the investigator was a high CSF pressure (42 cm H2O) that was noted to be 21 cm H2O after the infusion (normal 18 cm H2O). Baseline aspartate transaminase elevation was noted, which has been well described in patients with Tay-Sachs disease with no clinical relevance. There was a slight clinically insignificant transient rise in liver function tests that were considered related to the oral medications (Sirolimus or Keppra). One SAE of possible aspiration pneumonia was considered unrelated to the investigational therapy by the investigator. From an immunology standpoint, the patient was noted to have achieved adequate immunosuppression with no humoral or T-cell response to the vector. The patient's clinical condition was stable from baseline to month 12 without clinical deterioration observed on neurological exam. In addition, there was no deterioration in the MRI of the brain from baseline to the MRI at month three post infusion.
Patient #2
In June 2019, a six month old child with early symptomatic infantile Tay-Sachs disease received AXO-AAV-GM2 prior to the onset of severe symptoms, delivered into the thalamus bilaterally as well as into the cisterna magna and lumbar intrathecal space, the planned routes of administration for patients in the registrational program. The surgical procedure was well tolerated with no neurological defects noted. There were baseline elevated transaminases noted with a transient increase. This child is clinically stable at six months after dosing with plateaued development. Importantly, no seizure activity and no exaggerated startle responses were observed. By contrast, the patient’s untreated, two older siblings with Tay-Sachs disease exhibited rapid disease progression, clinical regression and seizure onset at 12 to 18 months of age. In addition, brain MRIs taken three and six months after administration (at 10 and 13 months of age, respectively) demonstrated no damage to the thalamus and normal new myelin deposition. By contrast, commonly reported MRI findings in infantile Tay-Sachs disease at this age include demyelination and cerebral and cerebellar atrophy. The CHOP INTEND score, a 16-item scale of motor function that has been validated in infants with neuromuscular disorders, was 58 out of 64 at baseline, increasing to a total score of 60 at month three following gene transfer and declining to a total score of approximately 52 at month 12 following gene transfer. Total CHOP INTEND scores sustained at levels greater than 40 points indicate a clinically meaningful improvement.
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AXO-AAV-GM2 was observed to be generally well-tolerated with no reports of SAEs related to the investigational gene therapy. One SAE was a febrile urinary tract infection due to Klebsiella (gram negative bacteria) and was considered unrelated to the investigational therapy by the investigator. No clinically relevant laboratory abnormalities were observed following administration, with a transient positive immune response related to the immunosuppressive agent, Sirolimus. The patient's clinical condition was stable from baseline to month six without gain or loss of milestones and a stable neurological exam with lower extremity weakness that is unchanged from baseline. In addition, the MRI showed no injury to the thalamus and an increase of myelin that is seen with normal brain development.
Our Key Agreements
Oxford BioMedica License Agreement
In June 2018, we, through our wholly owned subsidiary, ASG, entered into the Oxford Agreement, pursuant to which we received a worldwide, exclusive, royalty-bearing, sub-licensable license under certain patents and other intellectual property controlled by Oxford to develop and commercialize AXO-Lenti-PD and related gene therapy products for all diseases and conditions. In June 2018, as partial consideration for the license, we made an upfront payment to Oxford of $30.0 million, $5.0 million of which was applied as a credit against the process development work and clinical supply that Oxford is obligated to provide to us over the term of the Oxford Agreement. Under the terms of the Oxford Agreement, we could be obligated to make payments to Oxford totaling up to $55.0 million upon the achievement of specified development milestones and $757.5 million upon the achievement of specified regulatory and sales milestones. In April 2019, certain development milestones were achieved resulting in a $13.0 million net payment due to Oxford. We will also be obligated to pay Oxford a tiered royalty from 7% to 10%, based on yearly aggregate net sales of the underlying gene therapy products, subject to specified reductions upon the occurrence of certain events as set forth in the Oxford Agreement. These royalties are required to be paid, on a product-by-product and country-by-country basis, until the latest to occur of the expiration of the last to expire valid claim of a licensed patent covering such product in such country, the expiration of regulatory exclusivity for such product in such country, or 10 years after the first commercial sale of such product in such country.
We are solely responsible, at our expense, for all activities related to the development and commercialization of the gene therapy products. Pursuant to the Oxford Agreement, we are required to use commercially reasonable efforts to develop, obtain regulatory approval of, and commercialize a gene therapy product in the United States and at least one major market country in Europe. In addition, we are required to meet certain diligence milestones and to include at least one U.S.-based clinical trial site in a pivotal study of a gene therapy product. If we fail to meet any of these specified development milestones, we may cure such failure by paying Oxford certain fees, which range from $0.5 million to $1.0 million. In July 2020, we entered into a three-year clinical supply agreement with Oxford for the manufacturing and supply of cGMP batches to support the ongoing and future clinical development of AXO-Lenti-PD. Pursuant to the Oxford Agreement, Oxford is expected to be our commercial cGMP manufacturer for AXO-Lenti-PD, subject to a separate commercial supply agreement to be negotiated between the parties. We have the right to terminate the Oxford Agreement at any time upon two months' advance written notice prior to the first commercial sale of a product, or for a specified period of advance written notice after the first commercial sale of a product. Either party may terminate the Oxford Agreement for the other party's uncured material breach or with respect to a failure to make a required payment.
The University of Massachusetts Medical School Exclusive License Agreement
In December 2018, we, through our wholly owned subsidiary, ASG, entered into an exclusive license agreement (the "UMMS Agreement") with UMMS pursuant to which we received a worldwide, royalty-bearing, sub-licensable license under certain patent applications and any patents issuing therefrom, biological materials and know-how controlled by UMMS to develop and commercialize gene therapy product candidates, including AXO-AAV-GM1 and AXO-AAV-GM2, for the treatment of GM1 gangliosidosis and GM2 gangliosidosis (including Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease). This license is exclusive with respect to patents and biological materials and non-exclusive with respect to know-how and is subject to UMMS' retained rights for academic research, teaching and non-commercial patient care purposes, as well as to certain pre-existing rights of the U.S. government.
Under the UMMS Agreement, we are solely responsible, at our expense, for the research, development and commercialization of the licensed product candidates. We will reimburse UMMS for payments made by UMMS for the manufacture of clinical trial materials for us, up to a specified amount. We are obligated to use diligent efforts to develop and commercialize the licensed product candidates and are required to achieve certain development and commercial milestones in accordance with the timeline set forth in the agreement.
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Under the terms of the UMMS Agreement, we made an upfront payment of $10.0 million. In addition, we could be obligated to make payments to UMMS totaling up to $24.5 million upon the achievement of specified development and regulatory milestones and $39.8 million upon the achievement of specified commercial milestones. In February 2019, certain development and regulatory milestones were achieved resulting in a $1.0 million payment to UMMS, and in October 2019, further development and regulatory milestones were achieved resulting in an additional $1.0 million payment due to UMMS. We are also obligated to pay UMMS tiered mid-single digit royalties based on yearly net sales of the licensed products, subject to a specified annual minimum amount. Additionally, we will pay UMMS a percentage of any revenues we receive from any third-party sublicenses to licensed products at rates ranging in the mid-single digits to mid-teens.
The UMMS Agreement will expire upon the expiration of our obligations to make royalty payments to UMMS, which continues until the later of the expiration of licensed patents and any applicable orphan designation exclusivity and 10 years after the first commercial sale of the licensed products. Upon such expiration, the licenses granted to us by UMMS will automatically convert to perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide royalty-free licenses. We have the right to terminate the UMMS Agreement at any time upon 90 days' advance written notice to UMMS. Either party may terminate the UMMS Agreement for the other party's uncured material breach upon 60 days' advance written notice, including in the event that UMMS reasonably determines we have not fulfilled our diligence obligations.
Financial Operations Overview
Revenue
We have not generated any revenue from the sale of any products, and we do not expect to generate any revenue unless and until we obtain regulatory approval of and begin to commercialize one of our gene therapy product candidates in development.
Research and Development Expense
Since our inception, our operations have primarily been focused on organizing and staffing our company, raising capital, and acquiring, preparing for and advancing our product candidates into clinical development. Our research and development expenses include program-specific costs, as well as unallocated internal costs.
Program-specific costs include:
direct third-party costs, which include expenses incurred under agreements with CROs and contract manufacturing organizations, the cost of consultants who assist with the development of our product candidates on a program-specific basis, investigator grants, sponsored research, manufacturing costs in connection with producing materials for use in conducting nonclinical and clinical studies, and any other third-party expenses directly attributable to the development of our product candidates; and
upfront payments for the purchase of in-process research and development and milestone payments, which include costs incurred under our agreements with Oxford and UMMS, as well as costs incurred for our discontinued AXO-AAV-OPMD, intepirdine and nelotanserin programs.
Unallocated internal costs include:
share-based compensation expense for research and development personnel, including expense related to common share awards and option awards issued by RSL, to its employees and employees of its wholly owned subsidiaries, as well as to certain of our employees;
personnel-related expenses, which include employee-related expenses, such as salaries, benefits and travel expenses, for research and development personnel; and
other expenses, which includes the cost of consultants who assist with our research and development but are not allocated to a specific program.
Research and development activities will continue to be central to our business model and will vary significantly based upon the success of our programs and the achievement of milestones requiring payments to our partners, Oxford and UMMS. For the three months ended June 30, 2020 and June 30, 2019, the majority of our research and development expenses were associated with our gene therapy product candidates, including development milestones achieved. We expect our research and development expenses to fluctuate over the near term depending on the progression of our gene therapy product candidates currently under development and as associated costs are incurred.
Product candidates in later stages of clinical development generally have higher development costs than those in earlier stages of clinical development, primarily due to the increased size and duration of later-stage clinical trials.
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The duration, costs and timing of clinical trials of our products in development and any other product candidates will depend on a variety of factors that include, but are not limited to, the following:
the number of trials required for approval;
the per patient trial costs;
the number of patients who participate in the trials;
the number of sites included in the trials;
the countries in which the trials are conducted;
the length of time required to enroll eligible patients;
the dose that patients receive;
the drop-out or discontinuation rates of patients;
the potential additional safety monitoring or other studies requested by regulatory agencies;
the duration of patient follow-up;
any delays in key trial activities and patient enrollment or diversion of healthcare resources as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic;
production shortages or other supply interruptions in clinical trial materials resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic;
the timing and receipt of regulatory approvals; and
the efficacy and safety profile of the product candidates.
In addition, the probability of success of our gene therapy products in development and any other product candidate will depend on numerous factors, including competition, manufacturing capability and commercial viability. We may never succeed in achieving regulatory approval of our gene therapy product candidates for any indication in any country. As a result of the uncertainties discussed above, we are unable to determine in advance the duration and completion costs of any clinical trial we conduct, or when and to what extent we will generate revenue from the commercialization and sale of our products in development or other product candidates, if at all.
General and Administrative Expense
General and administrative expenses consist primarily of share-based compensation, legal and accounting fees, consulting services, and employee-related expenses, such as salaries, benefits and travel expenses, for general and administrative personnel.
We anticipate that our general and administrative expenses will continue to decrease in the near term, primarily as the result of further reductions expected in overhead-related expenses.

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Results of Operations for the Three Months Ended June 30, 2020 and 2019
The following table summarizes our results of operations for the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019 (in thousands):
Three Months Ended June 30,
20202019Change
Operating expenses:
Research and development expenses
(includes $563 and $721 of share-based compensation expense for the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively)
$5,194  $21,090  $(15,896) 
General and administrative expenses
(includes $1,027 and $1,414 of share-based compensation expense for the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively)
4,640  6,468  (1,828) 
Total operating expenses9,834  27,558  (17,724) 
Interest expense
796  1,558  (762) 
Other income
(2,066) (1,097) (969) 
Loss before income tax expense(8,564) (28,019) 19,455  
Income tax expense30  38  (8) 
Net loss$(8,594) $(28,057) $19,463  
Research and Development Expenses
Our research and development expenses during the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019 consisted of the following (in thousands):
Three Months Ended June 30,
20202019Change
Program-specific costs:
AXO-Lenti-PD$1,658  $14,400  $(12,742) 
AXO-AAV-GM1 and AXO-AAV-GM2385  1,000  (615) 
AXO-AAV-OPMD—  1,776  (1,776) 
Discontinued small molecule programs—  111  (111) 
Unallocated internal costs:
Share-based compensation expense563  721  (158) 
Personnel-related1,960  2,150  (190) 
Other628  932  (304) 
Total research and development expenses$5,194  $21,090  $(15,896) 
Research and development expenses were $5.2 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020 compared to $21.1 million for the three months ended June 30, 2019. Excluding the net amount of $13.0 million due to Oxford for a development milestone achieved during the three months ended June 30, 2019, research and development expenses decreased by $2.9 million as compared to the three months ended June 30, 2019, primarily related to the discontinuation of our legacy AXO-AAV-OPMD program in September 2019.
General and Administrative Expenses
General and administrative expenses were $4.6 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020 compared to $6.5 million for the three months ended June 30, 2019, with the decrease of $1.9 million primarily related to reductions in (i) personnel costs of $0.8 million and share-based compensation expense of $0.4 million attributable to reduced headcount, and (ii) pharmaceutical market research expenses of $0.6 million.

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Interest Expense
Interest expense was $0.8 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020, and $1.6 million for the three months ended June 30, 2019, which consisted of interest paid and the amortization of debt discount related to our loan and security agreement (the "Loan Agreement") with Hercules Capital, Inc. ("Hercules"), and also included a loss on extinguishment of debt of approximately $0.5 million during the three months ended June 30, 2020, whereby in April 2020, we prepaid the remaining outstanding principal balance, equal to $15.7 million, together with $0.3 million of accrued interest, fees and other amounts due. Additionally, we prepaid approximately $15.7 million of outstanding principal due without penalty in connection with the November 2019 amendment of the Loan Agreement with Hercules.
Other Income
Other income was $2.1 million and $1.1 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The three months ended June 30, 2020 included income of approximately $2.2 million associated with the exercise of a right to purchase convertible preferred stock that was received as compensation for services provided and certain intangible assets. All other income during the three months ended June 30, 2019 was attributable to foreign exchange gains.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Sources of Liquidity
Since our initial public offering in June 2015, our operations have been financed primarily through sales of common shares and pre-funded warrants, as well as borrowings under our credit facilities. As of June 30, 2020, we had $55.5 million of cash and cash equivalents available to us, and in April 2020, we prepaid the remaining outstanding principal balance, equal to $15.7 million, together with $0.3 million of accrued interest, fees and other amounts due under the Loan Agreement with Hercules.
Capital Requirements
We are currently in the clinical stage of operations and have not yet achieved profitability. We expect to continue to incur significant operating and net losses, as well as negative cash flows from operations, for the foreseeable future as we continue to develop our gene therapy product candidates and prepare for potential future regulatory approvals and commercialization of our products. We have not generated any revenue to date and do not expect to generate product revenue unless and until we successfully complete development and obtain regulatory approval for at least one of our gene therapy product candidates. Our current cash and cash equivalents balance will also not be sufficient to complete all necessary development activities and commercially launch our products.
We expect to spend substantial amounts to complete the development of, seek regulatory approvals for and commercialize our gene therapy product candidates. In addition, as part of our business development strategy, we generally structure our license agreements and collaboration agreements so that a significant portion of the total license cost is contingent upon the successful achievement of specified development, regulatory or commercial milestones. As a result, we will require cash to make payments upon achievement of these milestones under these agreements. Based on our anticipated timeline for the achievement of development, regulatory and commercial milestones, we do not expect significant milestone payments under our license and collaboration agreements to come due during the fiscal year ending March 31, 2021. 
Because the length of time and activities associated with successful development of our gene therapy product candidates are highly uncertain, we are unable to estimate the actual funds we will require for development and any approved marketing and commercialization activities. We anticipate that our current cash and cash equivalents balance will be sufficient to fund our clinical milestones for our gene therapy programs during the current fiscal year. Our future funding requirements, both near and long-term, will depend on many factors, including, but not limited to:

the progress, timing, costs and results of our clinical trials of our gene therapy product candidates;
the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on our business and operations, the medical community and the global economy;
the outcome, timing and cost of meeting regulatory requirements established by the FDA, the European Medicines Agency, or Japan’s Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency, and other comparable foreign regulatory authorities;
the achievement of certain development, regulatory and commercialization milestones that give rise to milestone and royalty payments to licensors;
the cost of filing, prosecuting, defending and enforcing our patent claims and other intellectual property rights;
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the cost of obtaining necessary intellectual property and defending potential intellectual property disputes, including patent infringement actions brought by third parties against us or our gene therapy product candidates or any future gene therapy product candidates;
the effect of competing technological and market developments;
the cost and timing of completion of commercial-scale manufacturing activities;
the cost of establishing sales, marketing and distribution capabilities for our gene therapy product candidates in regions where we choose to commercialize our products on our own; and
the initiation, progress, timing and results of our commercialization of our gene therapy product candidates, if approved for commercial sale.
As of June 30, 2020, our cash and cash equivalents totaled $55.5 million and our accumulated deficit was $767.2 million. For the three months ended June 30, 2020 and the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, we incurred net losses of $8.6 million and $72.6 million, respectively. As of June 30, 2020, we had $12.4 million of non-interest-bearing current liabilities due within one year.
Until such time, if ever, as we can generate substantial revenue from sales of our products in development, we expect to finance our cash needs through a combination of equity offerings, debt financings and potential collaboration, license or development agreements. We do not currently have any committed external source of funds. To the extent that we raise additional capital through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities, our shareholders’ ownership interests will be diluted, and the terms of these securities may include liquidation or other preferences that adversely affect our shareholders’ rights. Debt financing and preferred equity financing, if available, may involve agreements that include covenants limiting or restricting our ability to take specific actions, such as incurring additional debt, making capital expenditures or declaring dividends.
In addition, if we raise additional funds through collaborations, strategic alliances or marketing, distribution or licensing arrangements with third parties, we may be required to relinquish valuable rights to our technologies, future revenue streams, research programs or product candidates or to grant licenses on terms that may not be favorable to us. We cannot ensure that financing will be available in the amounts we need or on terms acceptable to us, if at all. Our ability to raise additional capital may be adversely impacted by worsening global economic conditions and the recent disruptions to, and volatility in, the credit and financial markets in the United States and worldwide resulting from the evolving effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, extreme price and volume fluctuations in the stock market in general, and the Nasdaq Global Select Market, in particular, have resulted in volatile and sometimes decreased stock prices for many companies, including us. Broad market and industry factors, including worsening economic conditions and other adverse effects or developments relating to the evolving effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, may negatively affect the market price of our common stock, regardless of our actual operating performance, and impact our ability to raise sufficient additional capital on acceptable terms, if at all. If we are unable to raise additional funds when needed, we may be required to delay, limit, reduce or terminate our product development or future commercialization efforts or grant rights to develop and market product candidates that we would otherwise prefer to develop and market ourselves. We anticipate that our current cash and cash equivalents balance will not be sufficient to sustain operations beyond nine months following the date that this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q was filed, which raises substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

To continue as a going concern, we will need, among other things, to raise additional capital resources. We continually assess multiple options to obtain additional funding to support our operations, including proceeds from offerings of our equity securities or debt, or transactions involving product development, technology licensing or collaboration arrangements, or other sources of capital to complete our currently planned development programs. Sources of a sufficient amount of financing may not be available to us on favorable terms, if at all, and due to these uncertainties, there is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as going concern.
At-the-Market Equity Offering Program
We have engaged SVB Leerink LLC as our agent to sell our common shares from time to time through an at-the-market equity offering program. SVB Leerink LLC is entitled to compensation for its services in an amount equal to 3% of the gross proceeds of any of our common shares sold. As of June 30, 2020, we sold approximately 1.4 million common shares for total proceeds of approximately $4.3 million, net of brokerage fees, under this program, and subsequent to June 30, 2020, we have sold approximately 1.1 million common shares for total proceeds of approximately $3.3 million, net of brokerage fees.

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Cash Flows
The following table sets forth a summary of our cash flows for each of the periods shown (in thousands):
Three Months Ended June 30,
20202019
Net cash used in operating activities$(13,503) $(17,731) 
Net cash used in investing activities(19) (78) 
Net cash used in financing activities(11,748) (5,014) 
Operating Activities 
Cash flows from operating activities consist of net loss adjusted for non-cash items, including depreciation and share-based compensation expenses, as well as the effect of changes in working capital and other activities.
For the three months ended June 30, 2020, net cash used in operating activities was $13.5 million and was primarily attributable to a net loss of $8.6 million, which includes costs incurred for research and development activities, including CRO fees, manufacturing, regulatory and other clinical trial costs, as well as our general and administrative expenses, a realized non-cash gain of $2.2 million associated with an investment in convertible preferred stock, net decreases in accrued expenses of $2.4 million and accounts payable of $1.4 million, and an increase in prepaid expenses of $1.0 million, which were partially offset by $1.6 million of non-cash share-based compensation expense.
For the three months ended June 30, 2019, net cash used in operating activities was $17.7 million and was primarily attributable to a net loss of $28.1 million, which includes costs incurred for research and development activities, including $13.0 million for development and regulatory milestones achieved, CRO fees, manufacturing, regulatory and other clinical trial costs, as well as our general and administrative expenses, which was partially offset by a net increase in accrued liabilities of $7.2 million that was related to the net payment of $13.0 million due to Oxford for a development milestone achieved that was unpaid as of June 30, 2019, less net payments made on other accrued liabilities of $5.8 million, as well as $2.1 million of non-cash share-based compensation expense.
Investing Activities 
Cash used in investing activities was $19 thousand and $78 thousand for the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively, and related to purchases of software, equipment and computers.
Financing Activities
For the three months ended June 30, 2020, net cash used in financing activities was approximately $11.7 million and consisted primarily of $15.7 million of principal payments made on long-term debt, partially offset by $3.9 million of net proceeds from the issuance and sale of our common shares under our share sales agreement with SVB Leerink LLC. For the three months ended June 30, 2019, net cash used in financing activities was approximately $5.0 million and consisted primarily of principal payments made on long-term debt.
Contractual Obligations
Our contractual obligations did not materially change during the three months ended June 30, 2020 as compared to those disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended March 31, 2020, except that in April 2020, we prepaid the remaining principal balance of $15.7 million of outstanding principal, together with $0.3 million of accrued interest, fees and other amounts, due under the Loan Agreement with Hercules.
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
We did not have during the periods presented, and we do not currently have, any off-balance sheet arrangements, as defined under the SEC’s rules. 

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Critical Accounting Policies and Significant Judgments and Estimates
Our management's discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations is based on our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles ("GAAP"). The preparation of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes requires us to make estimates, judgments and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities as of the dates of the balance sheets and the reported amounts of expenses during the reporting periods. In accordance with U.S. GAAP, we evaluate our estimates and judgments on an ongoing basis. Significant estimates include which costs are charged to research and development and general and administrative expense, as well as assumptions used to estimate our ability to continue as a going concern and estimate the fair value of our stock option awards. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other factors that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.
We define our critical accounting policies as those under U.S. GAAP that require us to make subjective estimates and judgments about matters that are uncertain and are likely to have a material impact on our financial condition and results of operations, as well as the specific manner in which we apply those principles.
Our significant accounting policies are more fully described in Note 2, "Summary of Significant Accounting Policies," to our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and in Note 2, "Summary of Significant Accounting Policies," to our audited consolidated financial statements in our Annual Report on Form 10-K. Not all of these significant accounting policies, however, require that we make estimates and assumptions that we believe are "critical accounting estimates." We believe that our estimates relating to share-based compensation for stock options granted, research and development accruals, income taxes and our ability to continue as a going concern have the greatest potential impact on our consolidated financial statements and consider these to be our critical accounting policies and estimates and are "critical accounting estimates." There have been no material changes to our critical accounting policies and significant judgments and estimates as compared to the critical accounting policies and significant judgments and estimates described in our Annual Report.
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
For a discussion of recent accounting pronouncements, see "Note 2(F)—Recent Accounting Pronouncements" in the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements included in "Item 1—Financial Statements" of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for additional information.
Item 3.  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Market risk is the potential loss arising from adverse changes in market rates and market prices such as interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates, and changes in the market value of equity instruments. As of June 30, 2020, we had cash and cash equivalents of $55.5 million, with cash consisting of non-interest-bearing deposits denominated in the U.S. dollar and Swiss franc, and cash equivalents consisting of interest-bearing money market fund deposits denominated in the U.S. dollar, which are invested in debt securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government and repurchase agreements fully collateralized by U.S. Treasury and U.S. government securities. We have policies requiring us to invest in high-quality issuers, limit our exposure to any individual issuer, and ensure adequate liquidity. Our primary exposure to market risk is interest rate sensitivity, which is affected by changes in the general level of U.S. interest rates, particularly because our cash equivalent investments are in the form of money market funds and marketable securities and are invested in U.S. Treasury obligations. Due to the short-term duration of our investment portfolio and the low risk profile of our investments, an immediate 100 basis point change in interest rates would not have a material effect on the fair market value of our portfolio.
Item 4.  Controls and Procedures
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
Under the supervision of our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, we evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of June 30, 2020, the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. The term "disclosure controls and procedures" (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), means controls and other procedures of a company that are designed to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms.
Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, as appropriate, to allow for timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Based on this evaluation, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of June 30, 2020, at the reasonable assurance level.
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Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting
There was no change in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(d) and 15d-15(d) under the Exchange Act) that occurred during the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
Inherent Limitations on Effectiveness of Controls
Our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures or our internal controls will prevent all error and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within Axovant Gene Therapies Ltd. have been detected.
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PART II: OTHER INFORMATION
Item 1.         Legal Proceedings
From time to time, we may become involved in legal proceedings relating to claims arising from the ordinary course of business. We are not currently a party to any material legal proceedings, and we are not aware of any pending or threatened legal proceeding against us that we believe could have an adverse effect on our business, operating results or financial condition.
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Item 1A.         Risk Factors
You should carefully consider the following risk factors, in addition to the other information contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including the section of this report titled "Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and related notes. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we face. Additional risks and uncertainties of which we are unaware, or that we currently believe are not material, may also become important factors that adversely affect our business. If any of the events described in the following risk factors and the risks described elsewhere in this report occurs, our business, operating results and financial condition could be seriously harmed, and the trading price of our common shares could decline. This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q also contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in the forward-looking statements as a result of factors that are described below and elsewhere in this report.
Risks Related to Our Business, Financial Position and Capital Requirements
We have a limited operating history and have never generated any product revenues.
We are a clinical-stage gene-therapy company with a limited operating history. Our operations to date have been limited to organizing and staffing our company, raising capital, acquiring product candidates and advancing our product candidates into clinical development. We have not yet demonstrated an ability to successfully complete a registration-enabling pivotal clinical trial, obtain marketing approval, manufacture a clinical-stage or commercial-scale product, or arrange for a third-party to do so on our behalf, or conduct sales and marketing activities necessary for successful product commercialization. Consequently, we have no meaningful operations upon which to evaluate our business and predictions about our future success or viability may not be as accurate as they could be if we had a longer operating history or a history of successfully developing and commercializing pharmaceutical products.
In addition, the failure of our clinical trials for, and the discontinuation of development of, intepirdine and nelotanserin has required us to reevaluate our business and led to dramatic shifts in our strategy and business plan. Our new strategy and business plan have not yet been proven and we may never be successful in developing or commercializing any of our gene therapy product candidates, including our newly licensed gene therapy product candidates, which remain in early stages of clinical development.
Our ability to generate revenue and become profitable depends upon our ability to successfully complete the development of our product candidates and to obtain the necessary regulatory approvals for their commercialization. We have never been profitable, have not generated any revenue from product sales, and have no products approved for commercial sale.
Even if we receive regulatory approval for our product candidates, we do not know when those candidates will generate revenue, if at all. Our ability to generate product revenue depends on a number of factors, including our ability to:
successfully commence and complete clinical trials and obtain regulatory approval for the marketing of our gene therapy product candidates;
establish effective sales, marketing and distribution systems for our gene therapy product candidates;
add operational, financial and management information systems and personnel, including personnel to support our clinical, manufacturing and planned future commercialization efforts and operations as a public company;
initiate and continue relationships with third-party suppliers and manufacturers, including Oxford BioMedica (UK) Ltd. ("Oxford"), Nationwide Children's Hospital and other third-party cGMP manufacturers, and have clinical and commercial quantities of our gene therapy product candidates manufactured at acceptable cost and quality levels;
attract and retain an experienced management and advisory team;
raise additional funds when needed and on terms acceptable to us;
achieve broad market acceptance of our products in the medical community and with third-party payors and consumers;
launch commercial sales of our products, whether alone or in collaboration with others;
compete effectively with other biotechnology and gene therapy companies targeting neurological diseases; and
obtain, maintain, expand and protect necessary intellectual property rights.
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Because of the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with product development, we are unable to predict the timing or amount of increased expenses, or when, or if, we will be able to achieve or maintain profitability. Our expenses could increase beyond expectations if we are required by the United States Food and Drug Administration ("FDA"), European Medicines Agency ("EMA"), Japan's Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency ("PMDA") or comparable regulatory authorities in other countries, to perform studies or clinical trials in addition to those that we currently anticipate. Even if our product candidates are approved for commercial sale, we anticipate incurring significant costs associated with their commercial launch. If we cannot successfully execute any one of the foregoing, our business may not succeed, and your investment will be adversely affected.
Our business, operations and clinical development plans and timelines could be adversely impacted by the effects of health epidemics, including the recent COVID-19 pandemic, on the manufacturing, clinical trial and other business activities performed by us or by third parties with whom we conduct business, including our contract manufacturers, contract research organizations, or CROs, shippers and others.
Our business could be harmed by health epidemics wherever we have clinical trial sites or other business operations. In addition, health epidemics could cause significant disruption in the operations of third-party manufacturers, CROs and other third parties upon whom we rely. For example, in December 2019, a novel strain of coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, causing a disease referred to as COVID-19, was reported to have surfaced in Wuhan, China. Since then, COVID-19 has spread to multiple countries worldwide, including the United States. Axovant Sciences, Inc. is based in New York City, we have business operations in North Carolina and Basel, Switzerland, and certain of our contract manufacturers are located in Europe. In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic. Numerous U.S. state governments, including the State of New York and surrounding states, have imposed continuing aggressive orders, health directives and recommendations to reduce the spread of the disease, including shelter-in-place directives and executive orders directing that all non-essential businesses close their physical operations and implement work-from-home schedules. We have implemented work-from-home policies for all employees of Axovant Sciences, Inc. The effects of these orders and our work-from-home policies may negatively impact productivity, disrupt our business and delay our clinical programs and timelines, the magnitude of which will depend, in part, on the length and severity of the restrictions and other limitations on our ability to conduct our business in the ordinary course. These and similar, and perhaps more severe, disruptions in our operations could negatively impact our business, operating results and financial condition.
We are dependent on an international supply chain for products to be used in our clinical trials and, if approved by the regulatory authorities, for commercialization. Quarantines, shelter-in-place and similar government orders, or the expectation that such orders, shutdowns or other restrictions could occur, whether related to COVID-19 or other infectious diseases, could impact personnel at third-party manufacturing facilities or the availability or cost of materials, which could disrupt our supply chain. Any manufacturing supply interruption of our product candidates could harm our ability to conduct ongoing and future clinical trials of our product candidates. In addition, closures of transportation carriers and modal hubs could materially impact our clinical development and any future commercialization timelines.
If our relationships with our suppliers or other vendors are terminated or scaled back as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic or other health epidemics, we may not be able to enter into arrangements with alternative suppliers or vendors or do so on commercially reasonable terms or in a timely manner. Switching or adding additional suppliers or vendors involves substantial cost and requires management time and focus. In addition, there is a natural transition period when a new supplier or vendor commences work. As a result, delays occur, which could adversely impact our ability to meet our desired clinical development and any future commercialization timelines. Although we carefully manage our relationships with our suppliers and vendors, there can be no assurance that we will not encounter challenges or delays in the future or that these delays or challenges will not have an adverse impact on our business, financial condition and prospects.
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In addition, our clinical trials may be affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Clinical trial progression, dosing, patient enrollment and related activities may be delayed due to prioritization of hospital resources toward the COVID-19 pandemic or concerns among patients about participating in clinical trials during a pandemic, and reporting of some clinical data may be incomplete or delayed if patients enrolled in our clinical trials are unable to fully participate in all necessary measurement protocols as a result of any such hospital resource prioritization, patient participation concerns or other factors associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Federal, state, and local guidelines for reopening in the United States and United Kingdom, where our clinical trials are being run, may negatively impact our ability to enroll additional patients in any of our clinical programs. Some patients may have difficulty following certain aspects of clinical trial protocols if quarantines impede patient movement or interrupt healthcare services. For example, patients in our clinical trials for AXO-AAV-GM1 and AXO-AAV-GM2 are infants, often with advanced disease, who may not be able to safely participate in clinical trials for these product candidates during the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, our clinical trial for AXO-Lenti-PD can involve elderly patients with advanced disease who may be unable to participate in clinical assessments at our research sites in the United Kingdom. Similarly, our inability to successfully recruit and retain patients and principal investigators and site staff who, as healthcare providers, may have heightened exposure to COVID-19 or experience additional restrictions by their institutions or local, state or national governments, could adversely impact our clinical trial operations.
The spread of COVID-19, which has caused a broad impact globally, may materially affect us economically. While the potential economic impact brought by, and the duration of, COVID-19 may be difficult to assess or predict, a widespread pandemic could result in significant disruption of global financial markets, reducing our ability to access capital, which could in the future negatively affect our liquidity. In addition, a recession or market correction resulting from the spread of COVID-19 could harm our business and the value of our common shares.
The global pandemic of COVID-19 continues to evolve rapidly. The ultimate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic or a similar health epidemic is highly uncertain and subject to change. We do not yet know the full extent of potential delays or impacts on our business, our clinical trials, healthcare systems or the global economy as a whole. However, these effects could harm our operations, and we will continue to monitor the COVID-19 situation closely.
We are in the process of implementing a business plan that may continue to evolve as we integrate our newly licensed gene therapy product candidates. Our business plan may lead to the initiation of one or more development programs, the discontinuation of one or more development programs, or the execution of one or more transactions that you do not agree with or that you do not perceive as favorable to your investment.
In June 2018, we announced that we received from Oxford a worldwide exclusive license to develop and commercialize AXO-Lenti-PD and its predecessor product candidate ProSavin® and related gene therapy products (the "Oxford Agreement"). In July 2018, we announced that we received from Benitec Biopharma Limited ("Benitec") a worldwide exclusive license to develop and commercialize investigational gene therapy AXO-AAV-OPMD and related gene therapy products (the "Benitec Agreement"). In December 2018, we announced that we had received from the University of Massachusetts Medical School ("UMMS") a worldwide exclusive license to develop and commercialize gene therapy product candidates AXO-AAV-GM1 and AXO-AAV-GM2 (the "UMMS Agreement"). We are pursuing a strategy to leverage our clinical experience and expertise for the clinical development and regulatory approval of our gene therapy product candidates. As part of our ongoing business strategy, we continue to explore potential opportunities to acquire or license new product candidates and to collaborate on our existing products in development.
We cannot be certain that our newly licensed product candidates will be successfully developed, or that the early clinical trial results of these product candidates will be predictive of future clinical trial results. We may determine at any time that one or more of our in-licensed product candidates is not suitable for continued development due to cost, feasibility of obtaining regulatory approvals or any other reason, and may terminate the related license. For example, in June 2019, we decided to terminate the Benitec Agreement following our decision to no longer pursue development of AXO-AAV-OPMD and related gene therapy product candidates. In addition, we have limited data from small, uncontrolled clinical trials, performed by or on behalf of Oxford, regarding the safety and tolerability of ProSavin, as the predecessor product candidate to AXO-Lenti-PD, in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, as well as nonclinical in vitro experiments with AXO-Lenti-PD. Prior ProSavin trials were not powered to demonstrate the efficacy of the therapy with statistical significance. Given the information above, these trials could be underpowered to demonstrate a potential clinical benefit for AXO-Lenti-PD in these indications.
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This business plan requires us to be successful in a number of challenging, uncertain and risky activities, including pursuing development of our newly licensed gene therapy product candidates in indications for which we have limited or no human clinical data, designing and executing a nonclinical and/or clinical development program for our newly licensed product candidates, building internal or outsourced gene therapy capabilities, converting early stage gene therapy research efforts into clinical development opportunities, identifying additional promising new assets for development that are available for acquisition or in-license and that fit our strategic focus and identifying potential partners to collaborate on our products. We may not be successful at one or more of the activities required for us to execute this business plan. In addition, we are also continuing to consider other strategic alternatives, such as mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, joint ventures, partnerships and collaborations. We cannot be sure when or if any type of transaction will result. Even if we pursue a transaction, such transaction may not be consistent with our shareholders’ expectations or may not ultimately be favorable for our shareholders, either in the shorter or longer term.
Our growth prospects and the future value of our company are primarily dependent on the progress of our ongoing and planned clinical development programs for our product candidates as well as the outcome of our ongoing business development efforts and pipeline expansion activities, together with the amount of our remaining available cash. The development of our product candidates and the outcome of our ongoing business development efforts and pipeline expansion activities are highly uncertain.
We expect to continue to reassess and make changes to our existing development programs and pipeline expansion strategy. Our plans for our development programs may be affected by the results of competitors’ clinical trials of product candidates addressing our current target indications, and our business development efforts and pipeline expansion activities may also be affected by the results of competitors' ongoing research and development efforts. We may modify, expand or terminate some or all of our development programs, clinical trials or collaborative research programs at any time as a result of new competitive information or as the result of changes to our product pipeline or business development strategy.
We expect to incur significant losses for the foreseeable future and may never achieve or maintain profitability. Our independent registered public accounting firm has expressed substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.
Investment in pharmaceutical and biological product development is highly speculative because it entails substantial upfront capital expenditures and significant risk that a product candidate will fail to gain regulatory approval or become commercially viable. We have never generated any revenues, and we cannot estimate with precision the extent of our future losses. We do not currently have any products that are available for commercial sale and we may never generate revenue from selling products or achieve profitability. We expect to continue to incur substantial and increasing losses through the projected commercialization of our product candidates. Our product candidates have not been approved for marketing in the United States or any other jurisdiction, and we may never receive any such approvals. We are uncertain when or if we will achieve profitability and, if so, whether we will be able to sustain it. Our ability to produce revenue and achieve profitability is dependent on our ability to complete the development of our newly licensed product candidates, obtain necessary regulatory approvals, and have our product candidates manufactured and successfully marketed and commercialized. We cannot assure you that we will be profitable even if we successfully commercialize our product candidates. If we do successfully obtain regulatory approval to market our product candidates, our revenues will be dependent, in part, upon the size of the markets in the territories for which we gain regulatory approval, the number of competitors in such markets, the accepted price for our product candidates and whether we own the commercial rights for that territory. If the indication approved by regulatory authorities is narrower than we expect, or the treatment population is narrowed by competition, physician choice or treatment guidelines, we may not generate significant revenue from sales of our product candidates, even if approved. Even if we do achieve profitability, we may not be able to sustain or increase profitability on a quarterly or annual basis. Failure to become and remain profitable may adversely affect the market price of our common shares and our ability to raise capital and continue operations.
We expect our research and development expenses to be significant as we develop our gene therapy product candidates. In addition, if we obtain regulatory approval for any of our product candidates, we expect to incur increased sales and marketing expenses. As a result, we expect to continue to incur significant operating losses and negative cash flows from operations for the foreseeable future. These losses have had and will continue to have an adverse effect on our financial position and working capital.
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Our independent registered public accounting firm has issued a going concern opinion on our consolidated financial statements for the one-year period following the date that our consolidated financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2020 were issued, which have been prepared assuming that we will continue as a going concern. We have not made any adjustments to reflect the possible future effects on the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that may result from the possible inability of our continuing as a going concern. We will need to raise additional capital when needed or adjust our operational plans to continue as a going concern. We continually assess multiple options to obtain additional funding to support our operations, including proceeds from offerings of our equity securities or debt, or transactions involving product development, technology licensing or collaboration arrangements, or other sources of capital to complete our currently planned development programs. Additional capital may not be available in sufficient amounts or on reasonable terms, if at all, and our ability to raise additional capital may be adversely impacted by potentially worsening global economic conditions and the recent disruptions to and volatility in the credit and financial markets in the United States and worldwide resulting from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
We are heavily dependent on the success of our gene therapy product candidates, which are still in early stages of clinical or preclinical development. If we are unable to successfully develop and commercialize any of our product candidates, our business will be harmed.
We currently have no products that are approved for commercial sale and may never be able to develop marketable products. We expect that a substantial portion of our efforts and expenditures over the next few years will be devoted to the development of our gene therapy product candidates, all of which are in the early stages of clinical development. Accordingly, our business currently depends heavily on the successful development, regulatory approval and commercialization of these product candidates. We cannot be certain that any of our product candidates will receive regulatory approval or be successfully commercialized even if we receive regulatory approval. The research, testing, manufacturing, labeling, approval, sale, marketing and distribution of our product candidates are and will remain subject to extensive regulation by the FDA, the EMA, the PMDA and other comparable regulatory authorities that each have differing regulations. We are not permitted to market our product candidates in the United States or in any foreign countries until they receive the requisite approvals from the FDA or comparable regulatory authorities in other countries. We have not submitted marketing applications to the FDA or foreign regulatory authorities and do not expect to be in a position to do so for the foreseeable future. Obtaining marketing approval is a lengthy, expensive and inherently uncertain process, and regulatory authorities may delay, limit or deny approval of our product candidates for many reasons, including:
we may not be able to demonstrate that a product candidate is safe and effective as a treatment for our targeted indications to the satisfaction of the applicable regulatory authorities;
our BLA or other key regulatory filings may be delayed or rejected due to issues, including those related to product quality and manufacturing, timing of results from supporting studies, database lock and data transfer;
the regulatory authorities may require additional nonclinical studies or clinical studies of the product candidate in Parkinson’s disease or other indications, which would increase our costs and prolong our development;
the results of our clinical trials may not meet the level of statistical or clinical significance required for marketing approval;
the regulatory authorities may disagree with the number, design, size, conduct or implementation of our clinical trials;
the contract research organizations ("CROs") that we retain to conduct clinical trials may take actions outside of our control, or otherwise commit errors or breaches of protocols, that adversely impact our clinical trials;
the regulatory authorities may not find the data from nonclinical studies and clinical trials sufficient to demonstrate that the clinical and other benefits of the product candidate outweigh its safety risks;
the regulatory authorities may disagree with our interpretation of data from our nonclinical studies and clinical trials or may require that we conduct additional studies;
the regulatory authorities may not accept data generated at our clinical trial sites;
the regulatory authorities may require, as a condition of approval, limitations on approved labeling or distribution and use restrictions;
the FDA may require development of a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy ("REMS") as a condition of approval;
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the regulatory authorities may identify deficiencies in the manufacturing processes or facilities of our third-party manufacturers; or
the regulatory authorities may change their approval policies or adopt new regulations.
We submitted an Investigational New Drug application ("IND") in late 2019 to support the initiation of a company-sponsored clinical trial of AXO-AAV-GM2 for the treatment of patients with GM2 gangliosidosis. Following its review of the IND, while the FDA had no concerns over animal toxicology or clinical safety in the AXO-AAV-GM2 program, the FDA placed the IND on clinical hold pending review of our responses to CMC and device-related questions. We are working with the FDA to allow for the clinical hold to be lifted. However, there can be no assurance that this clinical hold will be lifted in the near term or at all. If the FDA does not lift the clinical hold in part or in full, our development of AXO-AAV-GM2 may be delayed or discontinued, which would adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We will require additional capital to fund our operations, and if we fail to obtain necessary financing, we may not be able to complete the development and commercialization of our product candidates.
We are currently in the clinical stage of operations and have not yet achieved profitability. We expect to continue to incur significant operating and net losses, as well as negative cash flows from operations, for the foreseeable future as we continue to develop our gene therapy product candidates and prepare for potential future regulatory approvals and commercialization of our products. We have not generated any revenue to date and do not expect to generate product revenue unless and until we successfully complete development and obtain regulatory approval for at least one of our gene therapy product candidates. Our current cash and cash equivalents balance will also not be sufficient to complete all necessary development activities and commercially launch our products.
We expect to spend substantial amounts to complete the development of, seek regulatory approvals for and commercialize our product candidates. Because the length of time and activities associated with successful development of our product candidates is highly uncertain, we are unable to estimate the actual funds we will require for development and any approved marketing and commercialization activities. Our future funding requirements, both near and long-term, will depend on many factors, including, but not limited to:
the progress, timing, costs and results of our clinical trials of our product candidates;
the outcome, timing and cost of meeting regulatory requirements established by the FDA, the EMA, or the PMDA, and other comparable foreign regulatory authorities;
the achievement of certain development, regulatory and commercialization milestones that give rise to milestone and royalty payments to licensors;
the cost of filing, prosecuting, defending and enforcing our patent claims and other intellectual property rights;
the cost of obtaining necessary intellectual property and defending potential intellectual property disputes, including patent infringement actions brought by third parties against us or our product candidates or any future product candidates;
the effect of competing technological and market developments;
the cost and timing of completion of clinical-stage and commercial-scale manufacturing activities;
the cost of establishing sales, marketing and distribution capabilities for our product candidates in regions where we choose to commercialize our products on our own; and
the initiation, progress, timing and results of our commercialization of our product candidates, if approved for commercial sale.
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As of June 30, 2020, our cash and cash equivalents totaled $55.5 million and our accumulated deficit was $767.2 million. For the three months ended June 30, 2020 and the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020, we incurred net losses of $8.6 million and $72.6 million, respectively. We anticipate that our current cash and cash equivalents balance will not be sufficient to sustain operations beyond nine months following the date that the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and notes were issued, which raises substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. These estimates are based on assumptions that may prove to be wrong, and we could use our available capital resources sooner than we currently expect. For example, the FDA has placed a clinical hold on our IND for AXO-AAV-GM2 pending the resolution of certain questions, which makes it difficult to predict the timing of the initiation of this trial. In addition, the FDA could require us to conduct preclinical studies or clinical trials for any of our programs beyond those that we currently anticipate will be required.
To continue as a going concern, we will need, among other things, to raise additional capital. We continually assess multiple options to obtain additional funding to support our operations, including proceeds from offerings of our equity securities or debt, or transactions involving product development, technology licensing or collaboration arrangements, or other sources of capital to complete our currently planned development programs. Sources of a sufficient amount of financing may not be available to us on favorable terms, if at all, and due to these uncertainties, there is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. If we are unable to raise additional capital in sufficient amounts or on terms acceptable to us, we may have to significantly delay, scale back or discontinue the development or commercialization of our product candidates. Any significant delays in our programs may also require us to reevaluate our corporate strategy, resulting in the expenditure of significant resources and time, or potentially resulting in us discontinuing our operations.
Raising additional funds by issuing securities may cause dilution to existing shareholders, raising additional funds through debt financings may involve restrictive covenants, and raising funds through lending and licensing arrangements may restrict our operations or require us to relinquish proprietary rights.
We expect that significant additional capital will be needed in the future to continue our planned operations. Until such time, if ever, as we can generate substantial product revenues, we expect to finance our cash needs through a combination of equity offerings, debt financings, strategic alliances and license and development agreements in connection with any collaborations. We do not have any committed external source of funds. To the extent that we raise additional capital by issuing equity securities, including pursuant to our "shelf" registration statement filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") and our "at-the-market" offering of common shares, our existing shareholders’ ownership may experience substantial dilution, and the terms of these securities may include liquidation or other preferences that adversely affect your rights as a common shareholder. Debt financing or preferred equity financing, if available, may involve agreements that include covenants limiting or restricting our ability to take specific actions, such as incurring additional debt, making capital expenditures or declaring dividends.
If we raise additional funds through collaborations, strategic alliances or marketing, distribution or licensing arrangements with third parties, we may have to relinquish valuable rights to our technologies, future revenue streams, research programs or product candidates or grant licenses on terms that may not be favorable to us. If we are unable to raise additional funds through equity or debt financings when needed, we may be required to delay, limit, reduce or terminate our product development or future commercialization efforts or grant rights to develop and market product candidates that we would otherwise develop and market ourselves.
We may be required to make significant payments to third parties under the agreements pursuant to which we acquired our gene therapy product candidates.
Under our agreements with Oxford and UMMS, we are subject to significant obligations, including payment obligations upon achievement of specified milestones and payments based on product sales, as well as other material obligations. Some of these milestones require us to make payments prior to generating any product sales. We may not have sufficient funds available to meet our obligations at such time as any of these payments become due, in which case our development efforts would be harmed. Further, failure to make these payments or to meet our other material obligations may result in our counterparties pursuing various remedies under those agreements that could harm our operations.
We may not be able to manage our business effectively if we are unable to attract and retain key personnel. In addition, if we are unable to effectively transition and integrate our new executive officers, our business and financial performance could be adversely affected.
We may not be able to attract or retain qualified management and commercial, scientific and clinical personnel due to the intense competition for qualified personnel among biotechnology, pharmaceutical and other businesses, and the cost of living in the New York City area. If we are not able to attract and retain necessary personnel to accomplish our business objectives, we may experience constraints that will impede the achievement of our development objectives, our ability to raise additional capital and our ability to implement our business strategy.
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Our financial performance will depend in significant part on our senior management team and key employees with expertise in the gene therapy development field. We are highly dependent on the skills and leadership of our management team. Our senior management and key employees may terminate their position with us at any time. If we lose one or more members of our senior management team or key employees, our ability to successfully implement our business strategy could be seriously harmed. Replacing these individuals may be difficult, cause disruption, and may take an extended period of time because of the limited number of individuals in our industry with the breadth of skills and experience required to develop, gain regulatory approval of and commercialize products successfully. Competition to hire from this limited pool is intense, and we may be unable to hire, train, retain or motivate additional key personnel. We do not maintain "key person" insurance for any of our executives or other employees.
Many of the other biopharmaceutical companies that we compete against for qualified personnel and consultants have greater financial and other resources, different risk profiles and a longer history in the industry than we do. They also may provide more diverse opportunities and better chances for career advancement. Some of these characteristics may be more appealing to high-quality candidates and consultants than what we have to offer. If we are unable to continue to attract and retain high-quality personnel and consultants, the rate and success at which we can discover and develop product candidates, our ability to effectively manage any future growth and our business will be limited.
Our employees, independent contractors, principal investigators, consultants, commercial collaborators, manufacturers, service providers and other vendors, or those of our affiliates, may engage in misconduct or other improper activities, including noncompliance with regulatory standards and requirements, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations.
Our employees and contractors, including principal investigators, consultants, commercial collaborators, manufacturers, service providers and other vendors, or those of our affiliates, may engage in fraudulent or other illegal activity. Misconduct by these parties could include intentional, reckless and/or negligent conduct or other unauthorized activities that violate the laws and regulations, including those of the FDA and other similar regulatory bodies that require the reporting of true, complete and accurate information; manufacturing standards; federal, state and foreign healthcare fraud and abuse laws and data privacy; or laws that require the true, complete and accurate reporting of financial information or data. In particular, sales, marketing and other business arrangements in the healthcare industry are subject to extensive laws intended to prevent fraud, kickbacks, self-dealing, bribery, corruption, antitrust violations, and other abusive practices. These laws may restrict or prohibit a wide range of business activities, including research, manufacturing, distribution, pricing, discounting, marketing and promotion, sales commission, customer incentive programs and other business arrangements. Activities subject to these laws also involve the improper use or misrepresentation of information obtained in the course of clinical trials, the creation of fraudulent data in nonclinical studies or clinical trials or illegal misappropriation of drug product, which could result in regulatory sanctions and serious harm to our reputation. It is not always possible to identify and deter employee or third-party misconduct, and the precautions we take to detect and prevent this activity may not be effective in controlling unknown or unmanaged risks or losses or in protecting us from governmental investigations or other actions or lawsuits stemming from a failure to be in compliance with such laws or regulations. Additionally, we are subject to the risk that a person or government agency could allege such fraud or other misconduct, even if none occurred. If our employees, independent contractors, principal investigators, consultants, commercial collaborators, manufacturers, service providers or other vendors, or those of our affiliates, are alleged or found to be in violation of any such regulatory standards or requirements, or become subject to a corporate integrity agreement or similar agreement and curtailment of our operations, it could have a significant impact on our business and financial results, including the imposition of significant civil, criminal and administrative penalties, damages, monetary fines, suspension or delay in clinical trials, possible exclusion from participation in Medicare, Medicaid and other federal healthcare programs, FDA debarment, contractual damages, reputational harm, diminished profits and future earnings, additional reporting requirements and oversight, any of which could adversely affect our ability to operate our business and our results of operations.

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Our business and operations would suffer in the event of system failures, security breaches or cyber-attacks.
Our computer systems, as well as those of various third parties on which we rely, or may rely on in the future, including our CRO's and other contractors, consultants, and law and accounting firms, may sustain damage from computer viruses, unauthorized access, data breaches, phishing attacks, cybercriminals, natural disasters, terrorism, war and telecommunication and electrical failures. We rely on our third-party providers to implement effective security measures and identify and correct for any such failures, deficiencies or breaches. The risk of a security breach or disruption, particularly through cyber-attacks or cyber intrusion, including by computer hackers, foreign governments, and cyber terrorists, has generally increased as the number, intensity and sophistication of attempted attacks and intrusions from around the world have increased. We have experienced phishing attacks in the past, which have not had a material impact on our operations, however, we may in the future experience material system failures or security breaches that could cause interruptions in our operations or result in a material disruption of our development programs. For example, the loss of nonclinical or clinical trial data from completed, ongoing or planned trials could result in delays in our regulatory approval efforts and significantly increase our costs to recover or reproduce the data. To the extent that any disruption or security breach were to result in a loss of or damage to our data or applications, or inappropriate disclosure of personal, confidential or proprietary information, we could incur liability, suffer reputational damage, and the further development of our product candidates could be delayed.
Operation of our business internationally exposes us to business, regulatory, political, operational, financial and economic risks associated with doing business in various jurisdictions globally.
Our business strategy includes establishing and maintaining operations and certain key third party arrangements in various jurisdictions around the world. Doing business internationally involves a number of risks, including:
multiple, conflicting and changing laws and regulations such as tax laws, export and import restrictions, employment laws, anti-bribery and anti-corruption laws, regulatory requirements and other governmental approvals, permits and licenses;
failure by us or our distributors to obtain appropriate licenses or regulatory approvals for the sale or use of our product candidates, if approved, in various countries;
difficulties in managing foreign operations;
unexpected changes in tariffs or trade barriers;
complexities associated with managing multiple payor-reimbursement regimes or self-pay systems;
financial risks, such as longer payment cycles, difficulty enforcing contracts and collecting accounts receivable and exposure to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations;
reduced protection for intellectual property rights;
reduced protection of contractual rights in the event of bankruptcy or insolvency of the other contracting party;
natural disasters, political and economic instability, including wars, terrorism and political unrest, outbreak of disease, including the recent COVID-19 pandemic and related shelter-in-place orders, travel, social distancing and quarantine policies, boycotts, curtailment of trade and other business restrictions;
failure to comply with foreign laws, regulations, standards and regulatory guidance governing the collection, use, disclosure, retention, security and transfer of personal data, including the European Union General Data Privacy Regulation ("GDPR"); and
failure to comply with the United Kingdom Bribery Act 2010 ("U.K. Bribery Act") and similar anti-bribery and anti-corruption laws in other jurisdictions, and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, including its books and records provisions and its anti-bribery provisions, including by failing to maintain accurate information and control over sales and distributors’ activities.
Any of these risks, if encountered, could significantly harm our current or future international operations and, consequently, negatively impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

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Legal, political and economic uncertainty surrounding the planned exit of the United Kingdom ("U.K.") from the European Union ("EU") are a source of instability and uncertainty.
On June 23, 2016, the U.K. held a referendum in which a majority of the eligible members of the electorate voted for the U.K. to leave the EU. The U.K’s withdrawal from the EU is commonly referred to as "Brexit". The U.K. and the EU have agreed to a withdrawal agreement (the "Withdrawal Agreement"), which was approved by the U.K. Parliament on January 24, 2020. Under the Withdrawal Agreement, the U.K. is subject to a transition period until December 31, 2020 (the "Transition Period"), during which EU rules will continue to apply. Negotiations between the U.K. and the EU are expected to continue in relation to the customs and trading relationship between the U.K. and the EU following the expiration of the Transition Period.
The uncertainty concerning the U.K’s legal, political and economic relationship with the EU after the Transition Period may be a source of instability in the international markets, create significant currency fluctuations, and/or otherwise adversely affect trading agreements or similar cross-border cooperation arrangements (whether economic, tax, fiscal, legal, regulatory or otherwise). These developments, or the perception that any of them could occur, have had, and may continue to have, a significant negative impact on global economic conditions and the stability of global financial markets, and could significantly reduce global market liquidity and limit the ability of key market participants to operate in certain financial markets. In particular, it could also lead to a period of considerable uncertainty in relation to the regulatory process in Europe.
If the U.K. and the EU are unable to negotiate acceptable trading and customs terms or if other EU member states pursue withdrawal, barrier-free access between the U.K. and other EU member states or among the European Economic Area overall could be diminished or eliminated. The long-term effects of Brexit will depend on any agreements (or lack thereof) between the U.K. and the EU and, in particular, any arrangements for the U.K. to retain access to EU markets after the Transition Period. Such a withdrawal from the EU is unprecedented, and it is unclear how the U.K.’s access to the European single market for goods, capital, services and labor within the EU, or single market, and the wider commercial, legal and regulatory environment, will impact our U.K. operations. We may also face new regulatory costs and challenges as a result of Brexit that could have an adverse effect on our operations and development programs. There may continue to be economic uncertainty surrounding the consequences of Brexit which could negatively impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
Brexit may adversely impact our ability to obtain regulatory approvals of our product candidates in the U.K. or the EU and may require us to incur additional expenses to develop and commercialize our product candidates in the U.K. or the EU or receive clinical supply of our product candidates from manufacturing partners in the U.K.
Brexit has created political and economic uncertainty, particularly in the U.K. and the EU, and this uncertainty may persist for years. A withdrawal could, among other outcomes, disrupt the free movement of goods, services and people between the U.K. and the EU, and result in increased legal and regulatory complexities, as well as potentially higher costs of conducting business in Europe. The U.K.’s vote to exit the EU could also result in similar referendums or votes in other European countries in which we do business. Given the lack of comparable precedent, it is unclear what financial, trade and legal implications the withdrawal of the U.K. from the EU would have and how such withdrawal would affect us.
Since a significant proportion of the regulatory framework in the U.K. applicable to our business and our product candidates is derived from EU directives and regulations, Brexit, following the Transition Period, could materially impact the regulatory regime with respect to the development, approval and commercialization of our product candidates in the U.K. or the EU. For example, as a result of the uncertainty surrounding Brexit, the EMA relocated to Amsterdam from London. Following the Transition Period, the U.K. will no longer be covered by the centralized procedures for obtaining EU-wide marketing authorization from the EMA and, unless a specific agreement is entered into, a separate process for authorization of drug products, including our product candidates, will be required in the U.K., the potential process for which is currently unclear. In the U.K., this transition may result in delays in granting clinical trial authorization or marketing authorization, disruption of importation and export of active substance and other components of new drug formulations, and disruption of the supply chain for clinical trial product and final authorized formulations.
We anticipate that Oxford, which is based in the U.K., will continue to provide clinical and commercial supply for our AXO-Lenti-PD program. Brexit, following the Transition Period, could affect the clearance or timing of the release of our clinical trial materials out of the U.K. Any such delays could result in our clinical study sites outside of the U.K. not having sufficient clinical trial materials and could adversely affect the timing and completion of our clinical trials.
Any new regulations could add time and expense to the conduct of our business, as well as the process by which our products receive regulatory approval in the U.K., the EU and elsewhere. In addition, the announcement of Brexit and the withdrawal of the U.K. from the EU have had and may continue to have a material adverse effect on global economic conditions and the stability of global financial markets, and may significantly reduce global market liquidity and restrict the ability of key market participants to operate in certain financial markets. Any of these effects of Brexit, among others, could adversely affect our business, our results of operations, liquidity and financial condition.
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Use of social media platforms presents new risks.
We believe that our potential patient population is active on social media. Social media practices in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries are evolving, which creates uncertainty and risk of noncompliance with regulations applicable to our business. For example, patients may use social media platforms to comment on the effectiveness of, or adverse experiences with, a product candidate, which could result in reporting obligations. In addition, there is a risk of inappropriate disclosure of sensitive information or negative or inaccurate posts or comments about us or our product candidates on any social networking website. If any of these events were to occur or we otherwise fail to comply with applicable regulations, we could incur liability, face restrictive regulatory actions or incur other harm to our business.
The failure to maintain our current enterprise resource planning system ("ERP") could adversely impact our business and results of operations.
If our ERP system does not continue to operate as intended, the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting could be adversely affected or our ability to assess those controls adequately could be delayed. Significant delays in documenting, reviewing and testing our internal control could cause us to fail to comply with our SEC reporting obligations related to our management's assessment of our internal control over financial reporting.
Potential product liability lawsuits against us could cause us to incur liabilities and limit commercialization of any products that we may develop.
The use of our product candidates in clinical trials and the sale of any products for which we obtain marketing approval exposes us to the risk of product liability claims. Product liability claims might be brought against us by consumers, health care providers, pharmaceutical companies or others selling or otherwise coming into contact with our products. On occasion, large monetary judgments have been awarded in class action lawsuits based on drugs that had unanticipated adverse effects. If we are not successful in defending ourselves against product liability claims, we could incur liability and costs. In addition, regardless of merit or eventual outcome, product liability claims may result in:
impairment of our business reputation and significant negative media attention;
withdrawal of participants from our clinical trials;
significant costs to defend related litigation;
distraction of management’s attention from our primary business;
substantial monetary awards to patients or other claimants;
inability to commercialize our product candidates or any future product candidate;
product recalls, withdrawals or labeling, marketing or promotional restrictions;
decreased demand for our product candidates or any future product candidate, if approved for commercial sale; and
loss of revenue.
The product liability insurance we currently carry, and any additional product liability insurance coverage we acquire in the future, may not be sufficient to reimburse us for any expenses or losses we may suffer. Moreover, insurance coverage is becoming increasingly expensive, and in the future, we may not be able to maintain insurance coverage at a reasonable cost or in sufficient amounts to protect us against losses due to liability. A successful product liability claim or series of claims brought against us could cause our share price to decline and, if judgments exceed our insurance coverage, could adversely affect our results of operations and business, including preventing or limiting the commercialization of any product candidates we develop.
Disruptions at the FDA and other government agencies caused by funding shortages or global health concerns could hinder their ability to hire, retain or deploy key leadership and other personnel, or otherwise prevent new or modified products from being developed, approved or commercialized in a timely manner or at all, which could negatively impact our business.
The ability of the FDA to review and approve new products can be affected by a variety of factors, including government budget and funding levels, ability to hire and retain key personnel and accept the payment of user fees, and statutory, regulatory, and policy changes. Average review times at the agency have fluctuated in recent years as a result. In addition, government funding of other government agencies that fund research and development activities is subject to the political process, which is inherently fluid and unpredictable.
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Disruptions at the FDA and other agencies may also slow the time necessary for new drugs to be reviewed and/or approved by necessary government agencies, which would harm our business. For example, over the last several years, including for 35 days beginning on December 22, 2018, the U.S. government has shut down several times and certain regulatory agencies, such as the FDA, have had to furlough critical FDA employees and stop critical activities. If a prolonged government shutdown occurs, it could significantly impact the ability of the FDA to timely review and process our regulatory submissions, which could harm our business.
The COVID-19 pandemic has also resulted in the FDA imposing preventive measures, including postponements of non-U.S. manufacturing and product inspections. If global health concerns continue to prevent the FDA or other regulatory authorities from conducting their regular inspections, reviews, or other regulatory activities, it could significantly impact the ability of the FDA or other regulatory authorities to timely review and process our regulatory submissions, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.
If we fail to comply with applicable U.S. and foreign privacy and data protection laws and regulations, we may be subject to liabilities that adversely affect our business, operations and financial performance.
We are subject to laws and regulations requiring that we take measures to protect the privacy and security of certain information we gather and use in our business. For example, the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 ("HIPAA") and its implementing regulations impose, among other requirements, certain regulatory and contractual requirements regarding the privacy and security of personal health information. In addition to HIPAA, numerous other federal and state laws, including, without limitation, state security breach notification laws, state health information privacy laws and federal and state consumer protection laws, govern the collection, use, and storage of personal information. In addition, in June 2018, California enacted the California Consumer Privacy Act ("CCPA") which took effect on January 1, 2020. The CCPA gives California residents expanded rights to access and require deletion of their personal information, opt out of certain personal information sharing, and receive detailed information about how their personal information is used. The CCPA provides for civil penalties for violations, as well as a private right of action for data breaches that may increase data breach litigation. Although the CCPA includes exemptions for certain clinical trials data, and HIPAA protected health information, the law may increase our compliance costs and potential liability with respect to other personal information we collect about California residents. The CCPA has prompted a number of proposals for new federal and state privacy legislation that, if passed, could increase our potential liability, increase our compliance costs and adversely affect our business.
We may also be subject to or affected by laws and regulations globally, including regulatory guidance, governing the collection, use, disclosure, security, transfer and storage of personal data, such as information that we collect about patients and healthcare providers in connection with clinical trials and our other operations in the U.S. and abroad. The global legislative and regulatory landscape for privacy and data protection continues to evolve, and implementation standards and enforcement practices are likely to remain uncertain for the foreseeable future. This evolution may create uncertainty in our business, result in liability or impose additional costs on us. The cost of compliance with these laws, regulations and standards is high and is likely to increase in the future. For example, the EU has adopted the GDPR, which introduces strict requirements for processing personal data. The GDPR is likely to increase the compliance burden on us, including by mandating potentially burdensome documentation requirements and granting certain rights to individuals to control how we collect, use, disclose, retain and leverage information about them. The processing of sensitive personal data, such as physical health conditions, may impose heightened compliance burdens under the GDPR and is a topic of active interest among foreign regulators. In addition, the GDPR provides for breach reporting requirements, more robust regulatory enforcement and fines of up to 20 million euros or up to 4% of annual global revenue. While the GDPR affords some flexibility in determining how to comply with the various requirements, significant effort and expense has been, and will continue to be, invested to ensure continuing compliance. Moreover, the requirements under the GDPR may change periodically or may be modified by EU national law and could have an effect on our business operations if compliance becomes more costly than under current requirements.
It is possible that each of these privacy laws may be interpreted and applied in a manner that is inconsistent with our practices. Further, Brexit has created uncertainty with regard to data protection regulation in the U.K. In particular, it is unclear whether, post Brexit, the U.K. will enact data protection legislation equivalent to the GDPR and how data transfers to and from the U.K. will be regulated. Any failure or perceived failure by us to comply with federal, state, or foreign laws or self-regulatory standards could result in negative publicity, diversion of management time and effort and proceedings against us by governmental entities or others. In many jurisdictions, enforcement actions and consequences for noncompliance are rising. As we continue to expand into other foreign countries and jurisdictions, we may be subject to additional laws and regulations that may affect how we conduct business.

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We may not be successful in our efforts to identify and acquire additional gene therapy product candidates, or to enter into collaborations or strategic alliances for the development and commercialization of any such future product candidates.
Part of our strategy involves the business development activities of identifying and acquiring novel product candidates. The process by which we identify product candidates may fail to yield product candidates for clinical development for a number of reasons, including those discussed in these risk factors and also:
pre-clinical and early clinical results of any product candidates we acquire may not be predictive of future clinical results;
potential product candidates may, on further study, be shown to have harmful side effects or other characteristics that indicate that they are unlikely to be products that will receive marketing approval and achieve market acceptance; or
potential product candidates may not be effective in treating their targeted diseases.
In addition, the process of identifying and acquiring product candidates is highly competitive, and our ability to compete successfully is impacted by the fact that many of the companies with which we compete for these candidates have significantly greater experience, development and commercialization capabilities, name recognition and financial and human resources than we do. Further, our business development efforts are led by our senior executive officers and other management team members and would be significantly impaired if we were to lose the services of any of these executives. The time and resources spent on business development activities may also distract management's attention from our other development and business activities. Even if we are successful in identifying and acquiring additional product candidates, we may choose to focus our efforts and resources on a potential product candidate that ultimately proves to be unsuccessful. If we are unable to identify and acquire suitable product candidates for clinical development, this could adversely impact our business strategy, our financial position and